ed participle II

Status
Not open for further replies.

navi tasan

Key Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
Armenian
Home Country
Iran
Current Location
United States
Consider:
1-John was a technician properly trained.
2-John was a technician trained properly.

Which of the sentences 1 and 2 corresponds to:
A-John was a technician who was being trained properly.
and which corresponds to:
B-John was a technician who had been trained properly. John was a properly trained technician.
 
G

gwendolinest

Guest
Hmm. Neither 1 nor 2 sounds natural to me, really. They are not wrong; they just do not sound natural to me, that is all. I myself would use either A or B, as the case may be.

:)Fade-col:)
 

navi tasan

Key Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
Armenian
Home Country
Iran
Current Location
United States
Thanks Gwen.
What do you think about:
3-A man badly wounded couldn't have done that.
Would that be OK?
(I don't think it's the same thing as my other two examples, because here "a man badly wounded" is generic. It means every man who was badly wounded.)
 

RonBee

Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
navi tasan said:
Consider:
1-John was a technician properly trained.
2-John was a technician trained properly.

Which of the sentences 1 and 2 corresponds to:
A-John was a technician who was being trained properly.
and which corresponds to:
B-John was a technician who had been trained properly. John was a properly trained technician.

IMO, the sentences in example B correspond to (mean the same as) sentence 2. I agree with Gwen that the examples in A & B are more natural than sentences 1&2.

I wouldn't use sentence 1, but you could write it as: "John was a technician who had been properly trained."

8)
 

RonBee

Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
navi tasan said:
Thanks Gwen.
What do you think about:
3-A man badly wounded couldn't have done that.
Would that be OK?
(I don't think it's the same thing as my other two examples, because here "a man badly wounded" is generic. It means every man who was badly wounded.)

That sentence would be more natural as: "A badly wounded man couldn't have done that." When putting the adjectival phrase after the noun we would normally say it something like: "A man who had been badly wounded couldn't have done that."
8)
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top