emerges/differences

diamondcutter

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So then, my aim in this chapter is to pursue the possibility that the usages in categories (a)–(i) have more in common than emerges from their presentation in traditional list form.

Source: English Prepositions Explained Revised Edition by Seth Lindstromberg

I think the word “emerges” here is a noun and it means “differences”. What do you say?
 

5jj

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It's a verb.

Where did you get the idea that there is a noun 'emerge' meaning 'difference'?
 

Tarheel

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No. It's a verb, and it's a surprising choice.

The writer has some opinions you might not have seen before (apparently).

(There are places for originality. I would not consider that one of them.)
 

diamondcutter

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It was just my guess. Now I know I'm wrong. Could you please tell me what the subject of the verb “emerges” is?
 

Tarheel

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It was just my guess. Now I know I'm wrong. Could you please tell me what the subject of the verb “emerges” is?
My guess is that it's "usages" (which makes "emerges' look wrong).

I would not spend a lot of time on that if I were you.
 
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jutfrank

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It is a hard sentence. Read it like this:

... the usages in categories (a)–(i) have more in common than [what] emerges from their presentation in traditional list form.

I don't know if that helps you much. He means that there is a significant commonality of meaning among those nine usages. This commonality, this basic similarity in meaning, doesn't emerge very well from presenting them in traditional list form. A way of understanding the subject of the verb emerges which I've bracketed as 'what' is to substitute it for 'how much in common' or 'how much commonality of meaning'.

Does that make sense now?
 

Tarheel

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@jutfrank I think this illustrates how important context is. That is, by reading further I would better understand what the writer meant by those words.
 

jutfrank

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@jutfrank I think this illustrates how important context is. That is, by reading further I would better understand what the writer meant by those words.

Yes, that's right. Luckily, I have the source in my hand as I write this and I know very well what the author is saying.

I'm glad you're reading this excellent book, diamondcutter. Please feel free to ask about anything in it that you don't quite understand.
 

diamondcutter

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Thank you very much for your kind words, Jutfrank. I really appreciate the help from you and other teachers on this forum.
 

Tarheel

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@diamondcutter I have said at least 100 times on this forum how important context is. In fact, it's often how I figure out how to respond to a question.

Certainly, experience helps. As with anything, the more you practice the better you get at it.
 
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