English grammar

A

Anonymous

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Sorry to bother anyone, but I have two questions. The first is: How do you know which two pronouns to use with a compound word, e.g. she and I vs. her and me? I seem to remember a rule of some sort for this, but for the life of me can not remember it.
 

MikeNewYork

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Faith said:
Sorry to bother anyone, but I have two questions. The first is: How do you know which two pronouns to use with a compound word, e.g. she and I vs. her and me? I seem to remember a rule of some sort for this, but for the life of me can not remember it.

This subject confuses many people. The pronouns I, she, he, who, are subject pronouns. The pronouns me, her, him, whom, are object pronouns. When they are compound, the same rules apply: subject pronouns for subjects of sentences and clauses; object pronouns for objects of prepositions and verbs. When there are two, just drop one to check the proper case and then put the other back in. Remember that a compound subject requires a plural verb and politeness dictates that the other person goes first if you are one of the two.

SUBJECTS:
He and I are going to the park.
He and she are coming to my house.
You and I should try to solve this.

VERB OBJECTS:
Yesterday, I saw you and her in the library.
The teacher saw him and me in the library.
I already called him and her.

PREPOSITIONAL OBJECTS:
Between you and me, I already knew the answer.
I gave books to him and her.
The correct answers were given by you and me.
 
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