English law

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RightField

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Jan 8, 2009
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Hi

For no apparent reason it just came to my attention that people just don't say things like "the English law" as opposed to "English law" for instance in sentences like "under English law it is forbidden to blah blah blah". I kind of see why the definite article is not there, but is there a concrete reason why it is omitted? I guess we say "common law" and stuff like that so probably it's just the way it is, but if there is a reason as to why this is the case, I'd be more than grateful if you could explain it to me. Thanks a lot!
 

philadelphia

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Apr 22, 2008
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The English law is rather specific. Eg Under the English law of theft [...]. I am experienced in the English law of contract
English law is some kind of generalist. Eg Under English law [...]. Paul is experienced in English law.
 
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