Eraser

Ju

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After we rubbed the paper with an eraser, there're some dust-liked little things coming out from the eraser. Do I call it "eraser residue", "eraser shavings" or "eraser rubbings?
 

teechar

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After we rub [STRIKE]bed the[/STRIKE] paper with an eraser, [ 1] [STRIKE]there're[/STRIKE] there are some dust-like [STRIKE]d[/STRIKE] little things left [STRIKE]coming out[/STRIKE] from the eraser. Do I call [STRIKE]it[/STRIKE] them "eraser residue", "eraser shavings" or "eraser rubbings"?
I would just use "dirt" or "little bits of dirt". There is no real term for it.

[ 1]: Note that "there're" is incorrect.
 
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Ju

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I would just use "dirt" or "little bits of dirt". There is no real term for it.

[ 1]: Note that "there're" is incorrect.

I should use "there is" because "little things" is uncountable. Am I right?
 

jutfrank

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Good question! There ought to be a word for it—I'm sure I've had a need to refer to this many times before.
 
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teechar

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I should use "there is" because "little things" is uncountable. Am I right?
No. Use "there are". I've corrected my post above.
I meant to say that "there're" does not exist in English. "There is" can be contracted to "there's", but you can't do that with "there are".
 

Ju

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No. Use "there are". I've corrected my post above.
I meant to say that "there're" does not exist in English. "There is" can be contracted to "there's", but you can't do that with "there are".

There is no contraction for "there are", am I right?
 

Ju

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I would just use "dirt" or "little bits of dirt". There is no real term for it.

[ 1]: Note that "there're" is incorrect.

Dust-like little things are countable, am I right?
 

Glizdka

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Not a teacher
------


Can I call it rubber sprinkles/eraser sprinkles?
 

emsr2d2

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I'd use "shavings" if I had to come up with a word for them. I can honestly say I've never thought about it before. I imagine I would probably have said (as a child, when I actually used erasers) "There are bits of rubber all over the page!"

We always called them "rubbers", never "erasers" when I was a kid.
 

GoesStation

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There is no contraction for "there are", am I right?

Some people contract it to there're in speech. In writing, the contraction should only be used in quoted speech or very casual contexts.
 

Rover_KE

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We always called them "rubbers", never "erasers" when I was a kid.
So did we. I think rubbers are more likely to mean condoms to our American friends.
 

emsr2d2

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So did we. I think rubbers are more likely to mean condoms to our American friends.

I think I was probably about 13 when I started calling them erasers, once I realised the "other" meaning of "rubber". By that age, the use of "rubber" would cause tittering amongst pupils.
 

GoesStation

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So did we. I think rubbers are more likely to mean condoms to our American friends.
It also used to mean low, rubber overshoes we used to slip over our street shoes in inclement weather. Those have largely gone out of use, but I suppose some Americans still wear them.
 
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