European

Tdol

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Tdol

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Tanja

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Does j in transcription count for a consonant sound? :? Or it is somewhere in between consonants and vowels :D
 

blacknomi

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Tanja said:
Does j in transcription count for a consonant sound? :? Or it is somewhere in between consonants and vowels :D

Good question.

To be more specific, it's a palatal glide.
j is like consonant in that it can't stand along; it must precede(or follow) a vowel in order to form a syllable. /j/ and /w/ are sometimes called semivowels, and it may be said that they are the consonantal forms of the vowels /i/ and /u/.

:D
 

Tanja

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blacknomi said:
Good question.

To be more specific, it's a palatal glide.
j is like consonant in that it can't stand along; it must precede(or follow) a vowel in order to form a syllable. /j/ and /w/ are sometimes called semivowels, and it may be said that they are the consonantal forms of the vowels /i/ and /u/.

:D

Great explanation, Blacknomi! Thank you!

I do remember something like palatal glide from my phonetics class...but not much...
My Introduction to Phonetics says: "[j] - constrictive, mediolingual, palatal sonant". Hmmm... this word "sonant"... it makes me confused... What is that?
 

blacknomi

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Tanja said:
blacknomi said:
Good question.

To be more specific, it's a palatal glide.
j is like consonant in that it can't stand along; it must precede(or follow) a vowel in order to form a syllable. /j/ and /w/ are sometimes called semivowels, and it may be said that they are the consonantal forms of the vowels /i/ and /u/.

:D

Great explanation, Blacknomi! Thank you!

I do remember something like palatal glide from my phonetics class...but not much...
My Introduction to Phonetics says: "[j] - constrictive, mediolingual, palatal sonant". Hmmm... this word "sonant"... it makes me confused... What is that?
Thanks. You are most welcome. :oops: :D


You mean "sonorant".


Sonorants are sounds produced with a relatively FREE passage of air through the mouth or the nose. Notice: the opposite of sonorants are called 'obstruents'; the airstream cannot travel through the nose, it is obstructed(blocked) in the passage through the vocal tract.

It is marked as [+son] or [-son].

Sonorants:
Nasal stops: m, n, ing
Liquids: l, r
Glides: j, w
Vowels: you know that :D
 

Tanja

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blacknomi said:
Thanks. :oops: :D


You mean "sonorant".


Sonorants are sounds produced with a relatively FREE passage of air through the mouth or the nose. Notice: the opposite of sonorants are called 'obstruents'; the airstream cannot travel through the nose, it is obstructed(blocked) in the passage through the vocal tract.

It is marked as [+son] or [-son].

Sonorants:
Nasal stops: m, n, ing
Liquids: l, r
Glides: j, w
Vowels: you know that :D

Sonorant instead of sonant? Funny! Is there really a misprint in the book?! :? :D
 

Tanja

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Sonant=voiced consonant.
That's what dictionary says.
 

blacknomi

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You are right on that!

And all sonorants are sonants! But not all sonants are sonorants. :D
 

Tanja

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blacknomi said:
You are right on that!

And all sonorants are sonants! But not all sonants are sonorants. :D

Hehe :lol: Funny pun :lol:
 

Casiopea

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Tanja said:
blacknomi said:
You are right on that!

And all sonorants are sonants! But not all sonants are sonorants. :D

Hehe :lol: Funny pun :lol:

Great thread! :D

By the way, there's a syllable contraint in English wherein the sound u, as in you, is pronounced as a glide (i.e. [j], as in yellow) if it forms its own syllable:

Example
united, u'ni'ted (u forms its own syllable, so it's pronounced as [j].

Compare, united above with under:

under, un'der (u does not form its own syllable, so it's not pronounced as [j].

Don't let the spelling fool you:

European, u'ro'pe'an (u forms its own syllable, so its pronounced as [j].

Can you find the exceptions? :wink:
 

Tdol

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And 'one'- a one-day training course.;-)
 

Casiopea

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tdol said:
And 'one'- a one-day training course.;-)

English 'one' is similar in pronunciation with Japanese 'wan', the sound a dog makes. :lol:

Spot: Wan-Wan!
 

Teia

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Why? :lol:


Hi Tdol

The correct answer is : She is a European [ though I would have chosen no article if I had been given the opportunity : She is European / She is from Europe]

European is pronounced " ju..." like in university, union, uniform , UFO [ unlike "an Unidentified Flying Object} and many others.


Regards,
 
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RonBee

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Why? :lol:

It would be spoken as "She's a European" by 99.9% of Americans. Thatis because we use the article a before a consonant sound no matter what the spelling is. Examples:
She's a young person.
She's a yeller.
It's a yellow dog.
She's a European.
:)
 

Mad-ox

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Explain me why we have to put "a" in front of Europian. I think the correct form is She is Europian or much better she comes from Europe.
HAVE A NICE DAY!
 

RonBee

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Explain me why we have to put "a" in front of Europian. I think the correct form is She is Europian or much better she comes from Europe.
HAVE A NICE DAY!

Well, we don't have to. But the choice that was given was between a and an. Your choices are perfectly fine.

:)
 
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