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Maybo

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If ever you and your family are in Las Vegas I would love for you to be guests at my show!

What does 'ever' mean here? If I delete it, does the sentence mean the same thing?
 

Roman55

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It would be more natural to move ever in that sentence. "If you and your family are ever in Las Vegas..."

It means at some indeterminate time in the future. If you remove it you would be asking whether they are in Las Vegas now.
 

tzfujimino

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The "for" in your sentence is unnecessary, in my opinion.

... I would love you to be ...
 

Matthew Wai

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I take it to mean 'Whenever you and your family are in Las Vegas, I would ...'.
 

Matthew Wai

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If you and your family are in Las Vegas, whenever it is, I would ...
It is a possibility rather than an assumption.
 

teechar

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I would use "whenever that may/might be" instead of "whenever it is" in such contexts.
 

GoesStation

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If ever you and your family are in Las Vegas I would love for you to be guests at my show!
This sentence displays two aspects of American usage. Although more formal writing would place the adverb ever after the verb it modifies, are, we often move it forward.

We would, I think, nearly always say I would love for you to do whatever.
 

tzfujimino

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I didn't say it was wrong but unnecessary.
:)
 

tzfujimino

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I had found many examples here before I made my first post, of course.:)
 

GoesStation

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They prefer to include something unnecessary.

As speakers of American English, we feel that it's better with for than without it. As with the American use of off of, we expend a valuable preposition which the frugal Brits can save and donate to charity at the end of the year. :)
 

Maybo

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Then, what the difference between "love for you to" and "love you to"?
:?:
 

Roman55

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Then what is the difference...?

Isn't it obvious that the difference is one of AmE and BrE usage? There is no difference in meaning.
 
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