F.U.C.K. etimology

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Anonymous

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Dear Sir:
A friend told me the verb to F.U.C.K. has a meaning: "F" is fornication, "K" is king... and the other letters he doesn't know! I would like to know if that is true and, in affirmative case, the complete meaning!
Thanks a lot!
Yngwie
 

Casiopea

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Yngwie said:
Dear Sir:
A friend told me the verb to F.U.C.K. has a meaning: "F" is fornication, "K" is king... and the other letters he doesn't know! I would like to know if that is true and, in affirmative case, the complete meaning!
Thanks a lot!
Yngwie

First of all, I agree with todl's reply. Second of all, variations include:

Fornication Under Consent of the King
Fornication Under Charles the King
Fornication Under Crown of the King
Fornication under Christ, King
Forbidden Under Charter of the King (a sign posted on brothels closed by the Crown)
For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge
Forced Unlawful Carnal Knowledge
File Under Carnal Knowledge (how Scotland Yard marked rape files).

In short, the claim that the word 'fuck' derives from an acronymic phrase, either 'For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge' or 'Fornication Under Consent of the King is false.

Read more,CLICK HERE

All the best, :D
 

Tdol

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Mind you, if that is King Charles II, he did know a bit about the subject. ;-)
 

Casiopea

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tdol said:
Mind you, if that is King Charles II, he did know a bit about the subject. ;-)

What about William I, good 'ol Bill Clinton? :lol:
 

Tdol

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Good King Billy. ;-)
 

Tdol

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I doubt that she did much speaking.;-)
 
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yulia

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tdol said:
Mind you, if that is King Charles II, he did know a bit about the subject. ;-)

Tdol, I know my question might be irelevant to the whole subject at all, but still, I'm asking you to answer me for it.
What would be the exact translation for the word expression "Mind you"? I've checked in the dictionary, but I coulnd't figure out what exactly it means. Is it something like "unlike you"? :oops:
 

Francois

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No, it's used to make a remark e.g.
-- That MacThing tastes terrible.
-- Mind you, that's not too expensive, and the toilets are clean.

Either you mitigate something, or you branch off, so to speak, the main topic of the discussion.

FRC
 
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yulia

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Francois said:
No, it's used to make a remark e.g.
-- That MacThing tastes terrible.
-- Mind you, that's not too expensive, and the toilets are clean.

Either you mitigate something, or you branch off, so to speak, the main topic of the discussion.

FRC

Strange, when I read your reply first, I was laughing. You got me laughing so much!
Sounds funny, I know.
Thanks you for your reply anyway :lol: !
 
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