food and drink(s)

Status
Not open for further replies.

Winwin2011

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
Hong Kong
Current Location
Hong Kong
When I googled "food and drinks", I saw some people use ""food and drinks". Some use ""food and drink". Are they both correct? If we say "Let's go to the supermarket to get some food and drink", do we need to use plural form of "drink"?

When I googled the label for "No food or drink
”, I saw some labels showing “No food or drink". Some show "No food or drinks”. Which iscorrect?

Thanks.

 

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
They are both correct.

I'd say that 'food and drink' is the more common collocation in most contexts.

Rover
 

Winwin2011

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
Hong Kong
Current Location
Hong Kong
They are both correct.

I'd say that 'food and drink' is the more common collocation in most contexts.

Rover

Sorry, I still don't understand.

If we go to the supermarket to buy various kinds of drink, are the following sentences both correct?
1. Let's go to the supermarket to get some food and drink.
2. Let's go to the supermarket to get some food and drinks.

"A restaurant is a place which prepares and serves food and drink to customers in return of money." I wonder if it is correct to use "drinks" in the said sentence.

Are the following sentences both correct?

1. There was a liberal supply of drinks at the party.
2. There was a liberal supply of drink at the party.

Would appreciate if you further explain.

Thanks.
 
Last edited:

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
Your sentences are all correct.

'Food and drink' is more common.



1. There was a liberal supply of drinks at the party.
2. There was a liberal supply of drink at the party.

These are both correct. 'Drink' alone suggests that the drinks were alcoholic.

Rover
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
Sorry, I still don't understand.

If we go to the supermarket to buy various kinds of drink, are the following sentences both correct?
1. Let's go to the supermarket to get some food and drink.
2. Let's go to the supermarket to get some food and drinks.

"A restaurant is a place which prepares and serves food and drink to customers in return of money." I wonder if it is correct to use "drinks" in the said sentence.

Are the following sentences both correct?

1. There was a liberal supply of drinks at the party.
2. There was a liberal supply of drink at the party.

Would appreciate if you further explain.

Thanks.

"A liberal supply of drinks" suggests a combination of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages.
"A liberal supply of drink" suggests there was a lot of alcohol.
 

riquecohen

VIP Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2010
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
Brazil
I agree with the previous responses, but would like to add that when we go to the supermarket, it is for food and drinks,
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
I agree with the previous responses, but would like to add that when we go to the supermarket, it is for food and drinks.

Yes and no. If I were having a party and went to the supermarket for provisions, I would say "I'm going to the supermarket to get [the] food and drink [for the party]".
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top