Foreign Paper from when 'tis taken

Status
Not open for further replies.
A

Anonymous

Guest
Hi,

I am struggling with the underlined phrase. Could anybody do me a favor? :cry:

The Daily Courant was composed of a single sheet of two columns, it sold for one penny and offered its readers both domestic and international news (the latter translated from 'the Foreign Paper from when 'its taken')

Thanks a lot. :eek:

Mei
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
It's a mistake- it should read:
'the Foreign Paper from which it's taken'
or
'the Foreign Paper where it's taken from'

It's = the international news.
:)
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
Welcome to the forum and, by the Way, Mei, if you register, you can get e-mails telling you when you've got a reply, as well as other more advenced posting features. :D
 

Daruma

Senior Member
Joined
May 30, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
It's a mistake- it should read:
'the Foreign Paper from which it's taken'
or
'the Foreign Paper where it's taken from'

It's = the international news.
:)

'the Foreign Paper from which it's taken'
Sounds good.

'the Foreign Paper where it's taken from'
Why "where"?
 

svartnik

Banned
Joined
Jul 8, 2006
Member Type
Student or Learner
Hi Daruma,

Why are you digging up old threads? :-D
 

svartnik

Banned
Joined
Jul 8, 2006
Member Type
Student or Learner
'the Foreign Paper where it's taken from'
Why "where"?

taken from the Foreign Paper. taken from where?
If you want to elicit the object of the preposition, you need the adverb "where" because the prep phrase is a (locative) adverbial.
 

David L.

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2007
Member Type
Other
Since this is circa 1702, perhaps what was intended was:
'from whence 'tis taken'.
 

Daruma

Senior Member
Joined
May 30, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
1. "the foreign paper from which it's taken"
2. "the foreign paper that it's taken from"
3. "the foreign paper which it's taken from"
4. "the foreign paper it's taken from"
5. "the foreign paper where it's taken from"

Are these all grammatical in modern English?
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top