Forsake-abandon-leave

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dilodi83

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Can you tell me if the meaning of the sentence changes if I use a different verb.

1) I'm really sad, I hope to find a will to forsake this solid ground.
2) I'm really sad, I hope to find a will to leave this solid ground.
3) I'm really sad, I hope to find a will to abandon this solid ground.

I think these three verbs have the same meaning...Am I right?

Could you suggest me a phrasal verb that I could use instead of them?

Thanks in advance.
 

dilodi83

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who can explain it to me??
 

rewboss

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The basic meaning is the same, but there are very subtle differences.

"Forsake" is actually quite old-fashioned, so you'll usually only see it in literature. It sometimes carries with it the idea of self-sacrifice: you usually forsake something you once held dear. An alcoholic might forsake beer, or a woman might forsake her love in order to save her family's reputation. But "forsake" can also mean the same as "abandon".

If you "abandon" something, you often do this for your own benefit, not for anyone else's benefit. A man might abandon his wife and children in order to live with his mistress, for example. The captain of a sinking ship might give the order "Abandon ship" -- meaning the crew (and any passengers) should leave the ship in order to save their lives.

"Leave" is the more neutral term. It simply means to go away without taking the thing or person mentioned. If a man leaves his wife, that might be because he is selfish (the same as abandoning her), or it might be because she is a really terrible wife -- we have to judge from the context and what we know about these people to form an opinion.

In your sentences, I think any of those words will work. "Forsake" is the more dramatic one, but it is a bit old-fashioned. "Leave" is quite neutral and doesn't have the same impact. "Abandon" might mean that he feels himself to be a failure and should leave now for his own good, and that he doesn't care about anyone else. That sounds a bit odd in the first person.

These are just my opinions. Others might have completely different ideas.
 

dilodi83

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Thank you very much!!:)
 
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