full of leaves of different colours and textures.

newkeenlearner

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Are these bold words implied in the following way?

Nothing is more beautiful than walking down a long road (which is) lined with trees (which are) full of leaves of different colours and textures.

I wrote it.
 

cereal_chick

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"Nothing is more beautiful than walking down a long road lined with trees full of leaves of different colours and textures."

Sounds OK to me. If you wanted to be more explicit, you could well put "which is/are", but doing that twice in quick succession sounds a little clunky.

[Not a teacher]
 

newkeenlearner

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Nothing is more beautiful than walking down a long road lined with trees full of leaves of different colours and textures.

Can we say "...full of leaves with different ..." or will this change the meaning?
 

jutfrank

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Nothing is more beautiful than walking down a long road lined with trees full of leaves of different colours and textures.

Can we say "...full of leaves with different ..." or will this change the meaning?

It won't change the meaning but it's better to use of, not with.
 
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