future perfect

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valtango

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Feb 21, 2003
Good morning oh wise ones :)
I think I just deleted my post before I posted it.. oops, try again..
I was looking on line for grammar explanations about future perfect I have come up with:- "will have, plus the past participle" Then they give an example "I am going to have perfected my English, by the time I come back from the U.S." Is this correct?? My husband says it sounds totally wrong.. I'm not sure.
 

RonBee

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Perhaps:

  • I will have perfected my English by the time I get back from the US.

What do you think?

:)
 

valtango

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2003
sounds better

Yes thanks this sounds much better, it's what I would use too. The other one came as an example on a grammar web site, and it just didn't sound quite right to me.
 

Casiopea

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Sep 21, 2003
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valtango said:
"I am going to have perfected my English, by the time I come back from the U.S." Is this correct?

Correct.

Like all future forms, the Future Perfect cannot be used in clauses beginning with "when," "while," "before," "after," "by the time," "as soon as," "if" and "unless". In this lesson, all verbs in Time Clauses are italicized.

EXAMPLES:

I am going to see a movie when I have finished my homework.
Correct

I am going to see a movie when I will have finished my homework.
Not Correct

I am going to have perfected my English by the time I come back from the US.
Correct

NOTE: It is possible to use either "will" or "going to" to create the Future Perfect with little or no difference in meaning.

http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/futureperfect.html

The Future Perfect Continuous is used to express something in progress until a point of time in the future. If you want to use a future activity as an excuse, avoid to be going to, as that would make it sound like a personal preference at the moment. Use the Present Continuous instead, to make it clear that it is something you had already arranged, that you are engaged elsewhere.

I'm sorry, I'd love to have a game of chess with you, but I'm taking Mary out for dinner tonight.

(I'm going to take ...would make it sound as if you prefer Mary's company to your friend's).

http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/future.htm

:D
 
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