go off again

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beeja

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Hello,

The night was going off again, like an alarm.

what does "go off" here mean?

alarm goes off = it stops ringing but what's about the night? it's quiet?? :cry: pls help, tks.
 

jamiep

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Actually when an alarm "goes off" it means that it sounds. For example, If the fire alarm goes off we have to go outside.

I've not seen this phrasal verb usage before but it sounds like there was a lot happening.
 

beeja

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Thank you for your answer. It made me certain that "the night went off" = lot of things happened that night because when I read the whole paragraph, it sounded to me that there were many things happened that night, but I don't understand why the author compared it to the alarm though. :)
 

stuartnz

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I'm not a teacher, but I agree with jamiep. I think the comparison with an alarm was made to suggest a very noisy night. I've heard the expression "the night went off with a bang" to convey the same sort of idea. In that case a different loud noise is used for comparison, but I think both have the same sense, a raucous, loud, activity-filled evening.
 

vil

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Attention: I'm not a teacher.

Hi beeja,

I want to tell you thoughts on the matter.


go off = explode, detonate, also make sound, noise, sound like there was a lot happening, especially abruptly.

I heard the gun go off.
The sirens went off t noon.

This expression developed in the late 1500 s and gave rise about 1700s to the related “go off half-cocked”, now meaning “to act prematurely” but originally referring to the slipping of a gun’s hammer so that the gun fires (goes off) unexpectedly.

When you didn't speak to me straightaway I thought you'd go off again without a word to me.

Regards.

V.
 
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