going to or will

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brend10

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Could you please explain me when we should use ''going to'' .. and
when ''will/shall''

what is the differences between...

for example

I am going to do it tomorrow / I will do it tomorrow

I am going to do my homework / I will do my homework

or

this was one of the question they ask to my son in his exam.

It..... rain. So you should take your umbrella.


how I know/understand which one we must use ....

It is going to rain / It will rain
 

apex2000

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They mean the same as set out by you. It is simply a choice that we make without thinking about it.
 

brend10

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There has to be some differences as his teacher marked some of them ''will'' but some of them ''is going to''....
 

vil

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Hi brend10,

Will or going to?

Talking about future actions.

We use both will and going to to talk about our future actions, but there is a clear differences. Study this example situation:

Helen bicycle has a flat tire. She tells her father.
Helen: My bicycle has a flat tire.
Can you fix it for me?
Father: Okay, but I can’t do it now.
I will fix it tomorrow.

Will: We use will when we desire to do something at the time of speaking. The speaker has not decided before. Before Helen told her father, he didn’t know about the flat tire.

Later, Helen’s mother peaks to her husband.
Mother: Can you fix Helen’s bicycle?
It has a flat tire.
Father: Yes. I know. She told me.
I’m going to fix it tomorrfow.

Going to: We use going to when we have already decided to do something. Helen’s father had already decided to fix the bicycle before his wife spoke to him.

Here is another example:

Tom is cooking when he suddenly discoveres that there isn’t any salt.
Tom: Ann, we don’t have any salt.
Ann: Oh, we don’t? I will get some from the store.(she decides at the time of speaking.)

Before going out, Ann says to Jim:
Ann: I’m going to get some salt from the store. (she has already decided.)
Can I get you anything, Jim?

Saying what will happen (predicting) future happenings).

We use both will and going to to say what we think ill happen in the future:

Do you think Laura ill get the job?
Oh no! It’s already 4:00. We are going to be late.

E use going to (not will) when there is something in the present situation that shows what will happen in the future (especially the near futre). The speaker feels sure about what will happen because of the situation now (see also following example bellow)

The man can’t see where he is going. There is a hole in front of him.

He is going to fall into the hole.

Here the speaker is saying what he thinks will happen. Of course he doesn’t mean that the man intends to fall into the hole.

We use going to in the way when we say hat we think ill happen. Usually there is something in the present situation (the man walking towards the hole) that ;akes the speaker sure about what will happen.

Look at those black clouds! It is going to rain. (the clouds are there now)
Oh. I feel terrific. I think I’m going to be sick. (I feel terrific now)

Do not use will in situations like these.

In other situations, use will (see also the following examples)

When we talk about the future, we often say what someone has arranged to do or intends to do.

Tom is playing tennis on Monday (not Tom will play)
Are you going to watch television this evening? (not will you watch)

But often when we are talking about to future, we are not talking about arrangements or intentions. Study this example:

Tom: I’m really worried about my exam next week.
Ann: Don’t worry, Tom. You will pas.

“You will pass” is not an arrangement or an intention. Ann is just saying what will happen or what she thinks will happen.: she is predicting the future. When we predict a future happening or a future, we use will / won’t.

When you return home, you will notice a lot of changes.
This time next year I will be in Japan. Where will be you?
When will you find out your exam result?
To won’t pas his exam He hasn’t done any work for it.

We often use will with these words and expressions.

probably I will probably be a little late this evening.
I’m sure You must meet Ann. I’m sure you will like her.
I bet I bet Carol will get the job.
I think Do you think we will win the match?
I suppose I suppose we will see John at the party.
I guess I guess I will see you next week.

Regards.

V.
 

apex2000

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There has to be some differences as his teacher marked some of them ''will'' but some of them ''is going to''....

In that case there had to be more to the questions than you mentioned.
Vil has provided a number of examples but when you look closely it is still possible to use either. Both of them express a desire or intention. There are occasions when you would prefer to use one:
I will meet you at 7pm is better than I am going to meet you at 7pm but both can be used depending upon context.
'will' seems more definite, but 'going to' is just as definite in intention.
I will die. I am going to die.
Both the above carry the same meaning.

So I am puzzled by the different answers given to your son.
 

brend10

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hi apex

I'm certainly agree with you.

Vil explained very well... But I thnik they souldn't ask this kind of questions in the exam.

Look at this example which Vil gave it:
Tom: I’m really worried about my exam next week.
Ann: Don’t worry, Tom. You ...........


If they ask you to complete the blank.

As Vil wrote the answer is; You will pas ...

Vil says, Ann is just saying what will happen or what she thinks will happen.: she is predicting the future...

We use going to in the way when we say that we think will happen.

But sure I can think that (for example I know he studied well and the questions are easy... etc etc..) it will happen.

So I can also say ''Don't worry, Tom. You're going to pas''

as they wouldn't know what is my intention... in that case, both answers are correct... So If they don't give the complete dialogues and the whole event...they shouldn't ask such questions in the examinations.
 

apex2000

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hi apex

I'm certainly agree with you. I certainly agree with you OR I am agreeing with you OR I am in agreement with you

Vil explained very well... But I thnik they souldn't ask this kind of questions in the exam. Vil explained it very well; but I think they should not have asked this kind of question (these kinds of questions) in the exam.

Look at this example which Vil provided(gave it):
Tom: I’m really worried about my exam next week.
Ann: Don’t worry, Tom. You ...........


If they ask you to complete the blank.

As Vil wrote the answer is; You will pas ...
You will pass OR you are going to pass. Both mean the same here. Ann is making a positive statement trying to give Tom assurance. Neither she nor Tom can know at that time what the result will be.

Vil says, Ann is just saying what will happen or what she thinks will happen.: she is predicting the future... No. She is not 'predicting' (impossible here) just thinking and hoping what will happen.

We use going to in the way when we say that we think it will happen.

But sure I can think that (for example I know he studied well and the questions are easy... etc etc..) it will happen. Not really. Imagine if Tom has a bad day. Saying something will happen is a positive where nothing can stop it. It will rain tomorrow. Will it? How can you be sure? It is going to rain tomorrow. Is that certain? Can you be so sure?

So I can also say ''Don't worry, Tom. You're going to pas'' Yes, you can say that because you are being positive, but you cannot be certain. Again I say, Tom can have a bad day.

as they wouldn't know what is my intention... in that case, both answers are correct... So If they don't give the complete dialogues and the whole event...they shouldn't ask such questions in the examinations.
I agree that the questions as posed do not give either the examinee or the examiner any way to chose the 'right' answer.
I have made some amendments to your reply. Look closely and ask me if you have any doubts about the changes made.:)
 

brend10

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hi apex...

You are brilliant... I've understood very well. Now it's clear ...

Thank you very much for the amendments too. Those amendsments are very useful to me. I'm appreciated what you did. I must study more.

I printed your explanations. So I will talk to my son's teacher If they don't give the whole view and all the dialogues, they should not ask these kinds of questions as ''fill the blanks''
 

apex2000

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hi apex...

You are brilliant I cannot accept that; just helpful I hope... I've understood very well. Now it's clear ...

Thank you very much for the amendments too. Those amendsments are very useful to me. (I'm) I have appreciated OR I appreciate OR I do appreciatewhat you did. I must study more.

I printed your explanations. So I will talk to my son's teacher If they don't give the whole view and all the dialogues, they should not ask these kinds of questions as ''fill the blanks''
You will notice from these further amendments that you have fallen into the same trap twice - I'm appreciated, above and, I'm agree, previously - where you are mixing the present tense with past. So here are a few examples:

I appreciate
I appreciated
I have appreciated
I had appreciated
I am appreciating
I was appreciating
I was appreciative
I was appreciated
I will appreciate
I will be appreciating
I will be appreciative

If you try putting each of these into a sentence you could understand better why you went wrong; if you are unsure then still try and post here for further help.
 
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