good teacher to

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navi tasan

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Which are correct:

1-He is a good teacher for teaching intermediate students.
2-He is a teacher good for teaching intermediate students.

3-He is a good teacher to teach intermediate students.
4-He is a teacher good to teach intermediate students.


I prefer 1 to 2. I think they mean that he is a good teacher for that work (teaching intermediate students).

I think 3 is correct but it means 'The fact that he teaches intermediate students shows that he is a good teacher'. The sentence is like 'He is a kind man to take care of people like you.'

I don't think 4 is correct.
 

svartnik

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He is a good (enough) teacher for/to intermediate students.
He is a good teacher to teach intermediate students.
 

Raymott

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Which are correct:

1-He is a good teacher for teaching intermediate students.
2-He is a teacher good for teaching intermediate students.

3-He is a good teacher to teach intermediate students.
4-He is a teacher good to teach intermediate students.


I prefer 1 to 2. I think they mean that he is a good teacher for that work (teaching intermediate students).

I think 3 is correct but it means 'The fact that he teaches intermediate students shows that he is a good teacher'. The sentence is like 'He is a kind man to take care of people like you.'

I don't think 4 is correct.
An unambiguous phrasing is: "He is a good teacher of intermediate students".
If you want to say: 'The fact that he teaches intermediate students shows that he is a good teacher' you're probably best saying that.
2. and 4. are not natural. 1. and 3. are ambiguous.
 

saleemabu

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An unambiguous phrasing is: "He is a good teacher of intermediate students".
If you want to say: 'The fact that he teaches intermediate students shows that he is a good teacher' you're probably best saying that.
2. and 4. are not natural. 1. and 3. are ambiguous.

I think the adjective usually comes before the the noun to describe it
a good teacher for / to
a nice guy
an interesting story
a romantice film
With best wishes.
saleemabu
 

Raymott

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I think the adjective usually comes before the the noun to describe it
It does if you're just listing phrases. In a sentence it comes where it belongs.
Do you have a boxer ready to fight Rocky?
What are they after?: A ready boxer? A ready-to-fight boxer? A ready-to-fight-Rocky boxer?
I would say: a boxer ready to fight Rocky.
 
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