grammar

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jwschang

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RonBee said:
I don't know who is smarter between us,
But men are from Mars and women are from Venus.
:wink:

Earthians are therefore neither men nor women. :D
 

Casiopea

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jwschang said:
RonBee said:
I don't know who is smarter between us,
But men are from Mars and women are from Venus.
:wink:

Earthians are therefore neither men nor women. :D


Men are Thursday (Thor) and Women are Friday (Friga). Both are weekly. :D
 

Tdol

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I'm sure there is a cheap answer in there, but will refrain. ;-)
 

jack

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CitySpeak said:
jiang said:
Is the sentence 'You can't have seen him last week. He was in New York' correct? Shouldn't it be 'couldn't' instead of 'can't' since it is 'last month'?

I think the "can't have + past participle" form is used mostly in British English. I would wait for a BE speaker to comment on that.

It exists in American English, but as I can recall, it's not something I've heard or read often at all.

Here is a link to that form on a grammar site.

It also has a relatively small amount of hits on Google. The form exists, but it's simply not something one often encounters in Amercan English. I think your best bet is to stick with "couldn't have + past participle". This is the form that you will mostly come across in reading and conversation, I would say. Actually, that is what I say.

"This is the form that you will mostly come across in reading and conversation, I would say. Actually, that is what I say. "

What difference in meaning does it make if i say:
I would say.
I will say.
 

Tdol

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Can't have + past participle is commonly used in British English. We use it when we are sure about the past action. ;-)
 

RonBee

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Re:
  • I would say.
The speaker is talking about a habit or something that is likely to happen. Example: "That's what I would say."
Re:
  • I will say.
The speaker is making a prediction. (Not very likely to be used.)

:)
 
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