grammar

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the word 'accomplice' if used in a sentence, would it be accompanied with the word 'to' or 'in'.........."accomplice to" or accomplice in"
 

Red5

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:hi:

That sounds about right. Was there a question you wanted to ask?
 

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Sadia said:
the word 'accomplice' if used in a sentence, would it be accompanied with the word 'to' or 'in'.........."accomplice to" or accomplice in"

In American English, either would be correct. One can be an accomplice to a crime or in a crime. My personal usage is to use "to" before a general crime or situation and "in" in other uses.

I would use:
He was an accomplice to murder.
He was an accomplice in the murder of Tom Jones.
He was an accomplice in the commission of that bank robbery.

I should add, however, that this might just be my personal preference.
 

Tdol

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I'd do the same in BE. ;-)
 

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Tdol

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Mind you, I've never murdered anyone. :lol:
 

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tdol said:
Mind you, I've never murdered anyone. :lol:

That thought hadn't crossed my mind. :shock:
 
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