Grammar

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puzzle

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See you on Thursday.
See you on the Thursday.
:?: In this case, with or without "the" will make any difference? Please.

I have not mistakes in dictation.
I don't have any time to see you today.
:?: I read these two sentences in a grammar book which says they are wrong
sentences. I can't see why? Please.
 

riverkid

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See you on Thursday.
See you on the Thursday.
:?: In this case, with or without "the" will make any difference? Please.

We don't normally use 'the' with the name of days, Puzzle.

I have not mistakes in dictation.

Present simple tense 'have' uses 'do not/don't for negatives.

I don't have [any] mistakes in dictation.



I don't have any time to see you today.

I don't see anything wrong with this one.

:?: I read these two sentences in a grammar book which says they are wrong
sentences. I can't see why? Please.

#
 

puzzle

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riverkidRe: Grammar
Quote:
Originally Posted by puzzle
See you on Thursday.
See you on the Thursday.
:?: In this case, with or without "the" will make any difference? Please.

We don't normally use 'the' with the name of days, Puzzle.




:?: She died on the Tuesday after the accident.
How about this sentence? I also read it in a grammar book. Please.
 

2006

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riverkidRe: Grammar
Quote:
Originally Posted by puzzle
See you on Thursday. This means I will see you on the first Thursday after today.
See you on the Thursday. This probably won't be the first Thursday after today. For example, I will be in your city the first seven days of June. Of course one of those days will be a Thursday, and I will see you on that Thursday, the Thursday of my week in your city.

:?: In this case, with or without "the" will make any difference? Please. Yes, it certainly can, as above.

We don't normally use 'the' with the name of days, Puzzle. Yes we usually don't, but sometimes do.




:?: She died on the Tuesday after the accident. This is a good sentence, and it means that she died on the first Tuesday after the accident.
How about this sentence? I also read it in a grammar book. Please.
2006
 

Neillythere

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As a Brit, but not a teacher, I would advise as follows:

1. By "Thursday", I would mean "next Thursday".
If you want to indicate any other Thursday, you need to say which Thursday and then I would use "the" as in "the Thursday after next". Your latest post would therefore be correct.

2. I agree with Riverkid on the 2nd sentence, except, my own personal style would be to leave out the "any", using the "KISS" principle - Keep it short & simple - avoid both repetition and unnecessary additional wording.

Hope this helps
 

puzzle

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Thank all of you very much!:)
 

riverkid

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riverkidRe: Grammar
Quote:
Originally Posted by puzzle
See you on Thursday.
See you on the Thursday.
:?: In this case, with or without "the" will make any difference? Please.

riverkid wrote: We don't normally use 'the' with the name of days, Puzzle.




:?: She died on the Tuesday after the accident.
How about this sentence? I also read it in a grammar book. Please.

There is a substantial difference between the sentence above and your first examples, Puzzle. Using, "See you on the Thursday" would be highly irregular in English.

Of course, when we want to specify a particular day still using its name, we have to add a 'the' but we always see a qualifying statement after, which shows how it's being specified.

the Thursday after next / the Friday of Golden Week / the Monday after my birthday / the Tuesday before Xmas / ...

I agree with NT that 'any' could be left out of the sentence.
 
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Neillythere

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Hi Folks

"See you on the Thursday" is just possible, but, as riverkid says, it would pre-assume a qualifier such as "of next week".

If someone were to ask:
"Can we meet sometime next week? What days are you free?"
The response might be: "I'm free on Wednesday or Thursday",
to which the response would be: "I'll see you on the Thursday, then".

As noted above it pre-assumes a qualifier such as "of next week".

Hope this helps.
 

riverkid

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Thank you, NT. A very important point that I failed to mention, that the specifier could come at an earlier point in the conversation.
 
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