grammer

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svivekanandarajah

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The difference between
because and because of
 

Tdol

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We use 'because' with a verb phrase and 'because of' with a noun phrase:

I took a coat because it was cold. (verb phrase)

I took a coat because of the cold. (No verb)

BTW- you mis-spelled 'grammar'. ;-)
 

MikeNewYork

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tdol said:
We use 'because' with a verb phrase and 'because of' with a noun phrase:

I took a coat because it was cold. (verb phrase)

I took a coat because of the cold. (No verb)

BTW- you mis-spelled 'grammar'. ;-)

I think I would phrase that differently, because "it was cold" is a clause.

"Because" is a conjunction; as such, it takes a clause.
"Because of" is a preposition; as such it takes a noun or pronoun object.
 

Tdol

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MikeNewYork said:
tdol said:
We use 'because' with a verb phrase and 'because of' with a noun phrase:

I took a coat because it was cold. (verb phrase)

I took a coat because of the cold. (No verb)

BTW- you mis-spelled 'grammar'. ;-)

I think I would phrase that differently, because "it was cold" is a clause.

"Because" is a conjunction; as such, it takes a clause.
"Because of" is a preposition; as such it takes a noun or pronoun object.

I was trying to keep it simple- the thread's called 'grammer'. :lol: :lol:
 
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