Gumming my taters

Mahi93

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"Gumming my taters"

Does this mean that this person has no teeth and is chewing his potatoes with his gums?
 

BobK

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Sounds likely. Taters can also mean cold (rhyming slang: 'potatoes in the mould'), but I don't see how that could be related to 'gumming' (whatever that is ;-))

b
 

Mahi93

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Sounds likely. Taters can also mean cold (rhyming slang: 'potatoes in the mould'), but I don't see how that could be related to 'gumming' (whatever that is ;-))

b

Thanks BobK :)

Context:

In the 1800s
An old sailor has nothing to do because his ship is immobilized in the harbor by lack of wind.
Complete sentence:
Gumming my taters and sucking my lime.
The last part is obviously against Scurvy.
 

Tdol

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Mahi93

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That's how I'd interpret it- it's to show how much he has aged since setting out to go prospecting in the first verse:


Row Bullies Row - Jimmie Driftwood - YouTube

You are right, I’ve situated it wrong.
It is in fact a consequence of:
“I’ve been round the Horn I guess two dozen times”.
By this he indicates that he has aged (and lost his teeth in the process):lol:
 
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