hallucination

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FW

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Is this sentence correct:
1-He had a hallucination, talking to Napoleon.
 

whl626

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FW said:
Is this sentence correct:
1-He had a hallucination, talking to Napoleon.

Grammatically it is correct :) but there is no need to put a comma in between.

" talking to Napoleon " serves as an adjective phrase modifying ' hallucination. :)
 

RonBee

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FW said:
Is this sentence correct:
1-He had a hallucination, talking to Napoleon.

I think the sentence needs a little tweaking. (The hallucination wasn't doing any talking.) Perhaps:

  • [list:c4f3d8fb9f]He had a hallucination in which he imagined he was talking to Napoleon.

What do you think?

:) [/list:u:c4f3d8fb9f]
 

Casiopea

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FW said:
Is this sentence correct:
1-He had a hallucination, talking to Napoleon.

Hmm. My instincts tell me 'It's an iffy'. I've seen the form "..., -ing" in prose--I believe it's a form poetic license. When it comes to punctuation, however, the less the commas the better is the rule, so I agree with RonBee et al. It's a tad bid disjunctive separating 'halluciantions' from its modifier.

How about

1-He had a halluciantion while talking to Napoleon. :shock:
 

whl626

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How about ' He had a talking to Napoleon hallucination ' :)
 
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FW

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Thank you all.
Actually, I think I have confused everybody, starting with myself:
He had a hallucination talking to Napoleon.
could only mean that he had a hallucination while he was talking to Napoleon.
A hallucination cannot talk.
The correct sentences would be, in my opinion:
A-He had a hallucination that he was talking to Napoleon.
and:
B-He had a hallucination of talking to Napoleon.

What do you think?
 

whl626

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This is what I mean :) same as " He had a talking to Napoleon hallucination :p. But to say it such way, it sounds awkward.

Ron's example is the best so far, I guess :)
 

Casiopea

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The correct sentences would be, in my opinion:

A-He had a hallucination that he was talking to Napoleon.
B-He had a hallucination of talking to Napoleon.

What do you think?

A- sounds okay. What do you think about,

"He hallucinated that he was talking to Napoleon." :idea:

B- sounds odd. The 'of' doesn't work well. It means, 'He had a hallucination belonging to talking to Napoleon. What do you think about,

"He had a hallucination relating to talking to Napoleon." :idea:
 

RonBee

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I suppose he could have had the hallucination while he was talking to Napoleon (instead of the hallucination being about talking to Napoleon), but it doesn't seem very likely. Perhaps:

  • While he was talking to Napoleon he hallucinated that Napoleon was a giant frog.

:wink:
 
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