Harp on about

Bassim

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I have tried to use "harp on about" in my sentence. In AmE is "harp on sth". I am wondering if my sentences are correct.

Maria harped on about Peter's smoking and drinking habits. He told her she should mind her own business or find a new husband. He was never going to kick the habits anyway.
 

Lynxear

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Yes, this is quite a good set of sentences.

"To harp on" means "to nag" in an extremely irritating way. You captured this well in your writing.
 

GoesStation

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Your text works fine in American English, too. I don't think we harp on something. People who perseverate harp on about the subject.
 

tedmc

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GoesStation

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In two of the fraze.it quotes, harp is the noun (the musical instrument), not the verb.
 

Tdol

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It has the meaning of harp on (about) something for me. (BrE speaker)
 

Lynxear

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har·py

ˈhärpē

noun
Greek & Roman Mythology

plural noun: harpies


  • a rapacious monster described as having a woman's head and body and a bird's wings and claws or depicted as a bird of prey with a woman's face.
    • a grasping, unpleasant woman.

I think the verb comes from the older English word as described above. Actually it describes my ex-wife as well {sigh}.
 
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