has or had

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jack

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It has rained for two days. <--correct?
It had rained for two days. <--correct?

what is the difference between the two?
When would i use the first one and the second one? Are both of these sentences correct? Should i use "has" for both of them because of the unspeficied time and you would use had for specific time.
If i can use has for both of the sentences above, then what is the point of having the rules for had and has, like had is for used specific times?

It had rained on April 26.
It has rained on April 26. <-- is this incorrect? why? if the above two is correct, why isn't this one correct too?
 

henry

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jack said:
It has rained for two days. <--correct?
It had rained for two days. <--correct?

what is the difference between the two?
When would i use the first one and the second one? Are both of these sentences correct? Should i use "has" for both of them because of the unspeficied time and you would use had for specific time.
If i can use has for both of the sentences above, then what is the point of having the rules for had and has, like had is for used specific times?

It had rained on April 26.
It has rained on April 26. <-- is this incorrect? why? if the above two is correct, why isn't this one correct too?

"It has rained for two days" is correct if the action( raining) is still active.
" It had rained for two days" is correct if the action is already completed.

:wink:
 

jack

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It had rained on April 26.
It has rained on April 26. <--is this one incorrect?

I am still a a bit not too clear on this:
Can you give me a scenario where i would use:
"It has rained for two days. "
"It had rained for two days. "


and
"It had rained on April 26. "
"It has rained on April 26. "




When i ask questions do i use "had" or "have"?
how do i know which one to use?

lets say i asked this question:
Have you studied yet?
or do i say
Had you studied yet? <--incorrect?
if i say "Had you studied yesterday?" <--correct? b/c i have stated a specific time?

which one do i use and why? and when would i use the other one?

Lets say i answered the question.
Yes i have <--correct?
or
Yes i had <--incorrect, unless i have a subsequent event right?
Yes i had studied at 10am. <--correct?
Yes i have studided at 10am <--is this incorrect? it states a specific time so i need to use had right?

Is it also correct to say:
Yes i had, i had studied at 8am. <--incorrect?
Yes i have, i had studied at 8am. <--correct?



i have another one.
Had you went to the mall yesterday?
Have you went to the mall yesterday? <--incorrect?
 

MikeNewYork

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jack said:
It has rained for two days. <--correct?
It had rained for two days. <--correct?

what is the difference between the two?
When would i use the first one and the second one? Are both of these sentences correct? Should i use "has" for both of them because of the unspeficied time and you would use had for specific time.
If i can use has for both of the sentences above, then what is the point of having the rules for had and has, like had is for used specific times?

The first (has) is present perfect. In this case, it refers to recent rains. The rain probably has stopped, but there are present consquences.

The grass is still wet. It has rained for two days.

If it has rained for two days and it is still raining, one would usually say "It has been raining for two days."

The second (had) is past perfect. This is used to describe an event that was completed before another time reference.

Last year I almost drowned when I fell into an old well. The well was full of water because it had rained for two days. [The rain occurred before the speaker fell].

It had rained on April 26.
It has rained on April 26. <-- is this incorrect? why? if the above two is correct, why isn't this one correct too?

The second is incorrect. We don't use present perfect with specific days/times. The reason is that it refers to an event that occurred in the past on a particular day. It is a simple statement of fact. We use past tense for that.

We can use the past perfect with a specific date if that date is before another event in the past.
 

MikeNewYork

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henry said:
jack said:
It has rained for two days. <--correct?
It had rained for two days. <--correct?

what is the difference between the two?
When would i use the first one and the second one? Are both of these sentences correct? Should i use "has" for both of them because of the unspeficied time and you would use had for specific time.
If i can use has for both of the sentences above, then what is the point of having the rules for had and has, like had is for used specific times?

It had rained on April 26.
It has rained on April 26. <-- is this incorrect? why? if the above two is correct, why isn't this one correct too?

"It has rained for two days" is correct if the action( raining) is still active.
" It had rained for two days" is correct if the action is already completed.

:wink:

If it is still raining, we would normally say, "It has been raining for two days". :wink:
 

jack

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thanks, it is getting clear now.
so usually in our daily lives we would use "has" instead of "had"?

am i asking the questing correctly?
"so usually in our daily lives we would use "has" instead of "had"?"
or do i say
"so usually in our daily lives we will use "has" instead of "had"?"

what is the difference in meaning between the two?
 

MikeNewYork

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jack said:
thanks, it is getting clear now.
so usually in our daily lives we would use "has" instead of "had"?

Yes, I think the present perfect is more common than the past perfect. However, one cannot choose between them based only on frequency.

am i asking the questing correctly?
"so usually in our daily lives we would use "has" instead of "had"?"
or do i say
"so usually in our daily lives we will use "has" instead of "had"?"

what is the difference in meaning between the two?

I prefer "would" there. We are talking about possibilities and "would" is more about possibility than "will". "Will" is more about probablility.
 

jack

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I need help on asking questions.

When i ask questions do i use "had" or "have"?
how do i know which one to use?

lets say i asked this question:
Have you studied yet? <--how do i know if he is still studying or he had studided already? if he studided already do i use had?
is so, do i say
Had you studied yet? <--incorrect?
if i say "Had you studied yesterday?" <--correct? b/c i have stated a specific time?

which one do i use and why? and when would i use the other one?

Lets say i answered the question.
Yes i have <--correct?
or
Yes i had <--incorrect, unless i have a subsequent event right?
Yes i had studied at 10am. <--correct?
Yes i have studided at 10am <--is this incorrect? it states a specific time so i need to use had right?

Is it also correct to say:
Yes i had, i had studied at 8am. <--incorrect?
Yes i have, i had studied at 8am. <--correct?



here are some more questions i am having difficulties with:
Had you went to the mall yesterday?
Have you went to the mall yesterday? <--incorrect?

Have you seen Kill Bill? <--i dont care when he seen it?
Had you seen kill bill? <--ask for specific date?

Which one do i use?
As mention before, how do i know if he have seen it on a specific date or not?

btw (by the way):
do i say:
As mention before, how do i know if he have seen it on a specific date or not?
or
As mention before, how do i know if he had seen it on a specific date or not?

Do i use have or had? how do i know which one to use? What is the difference between the two questions if i use had instead of have and vice versa?
 

MikeNewYork

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jack said:
I need help on asking questions.

When i ask questions do i use "had" or "have"?
how do i know which one to use?

lets say i asked this question:
Have you studied yet? <--how do i know if he is still studying or he had studided already? if he studided already do i use had?
is so, do i say
Had you studied yet? <--incorrect?
if i say "Had you studied yesterday?" <--correct? b/c i have stated a specific time?

Have you studied yet is correct. One would only use "had" in that question if one were talking about study that occurred prior to another past event.

which one do i use and why? and when would i use the other one?

Lets say i answered the question.
Yes i have <--correct?
or
Yes i had <--incorrect, unless i have a subsequent event right?
Yes i had studied at 10am. <--correct?
Yes i have studided at 10am <--is this incorrect? it states a specific time so i need to use had right?


Yes, on all four.


Is it also correct to say:
Yes i had, i had studied at 8am. <--incorrect?
Yes i have, i had studied at 8am. <--correct?

The first could be correct, if we are talking in the past perfect -- prior to another event.

The second cannot be correct. "Yes I have" would answer a "Have you" question. That is present perfect. When you introduce a specific time, use the past tense tense. I studied... or I did study....


here are some more questions i am having difficulties with:
Had you went to the mall yesterday?
Have you went to the mall yesterday? <--incorrect?

That should be "Did you go to the mall yesterday. Past tense.

Have you seen Kill Bill? <--i dont care when he seen it?
Had you seen kill bill? <--ask for specific date?

Have you seen "Kill Bill"? That means before now.
Has you seen "Kill Bill"? That means before another event in the past.

btw (by the way):
do i say:
As mention before, how do i know if he have seen it on a specific date or not?
or
As mention before, how do i know if he had seen it on a specific date or not?

Do i use have or had? how do i know which one to use? What is the difference between the two questions if i use had instead of have and vice versa?

You say, As I have asked before or As asked before...

The second part now occurs after "if". That makes the construction different. One world use "had" there instead of "has" (use has with he, she or it). One could also use "saw" instead of "had seen".
 

jack

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"Yes i have studided at 10am <--is this incorrect? it states a specific time so i need to use had right?"

Yes i have studided at 10am <-- why is this correct?, why shouldn't it be had?
 

jack

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When i ask questions do i use "had" or "have"?
how do i know which one to use?

can you give me some examples on using "had" and "have" to ask questions? thanks in advance.
Links would really help too thanks again.
 

Tdol

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I have two brothers. (present)
I had a lot of work yesterday. (past)
 

jack

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I mean like examples on asking questions, do i use have or had?

like if i asked these questions:
Have you seen Kill Bill? <--does this mean,i dont care when he seen it?
Had you seen kill bill? <---does this mean, i want to know the exact time of when he saw it?

do i use have or had? How do i know which one to use?


"Had you started studying yet? <--is this even correct? so when i ask questionss, i can use had without using the past perfect rules? like this questions im asking doesn't have a subsequent event to it or anything?

"Have you started studying yet?"
What difference does it make when i ask questions using "had" or "have" ? when would i use "had" and "have" when asking questions?



Had you seen "Kill Bill"? <--is this correct? That means before another event in the past.
If it is correct, how come i dont need a subsequent event? Like how come i don't need to use past perfect rules when asking past perfect questions?
 

jack

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Joined
Apr 24, 2004
a)I filled up the gas two times this month.
b)I have filled up the gas two times this month.
c)I had filled up the gas two times this month.

Are A&B&C the same?
What is the difference between have and had for b and c. How would i use "have" when i'm speaking and "had"?


http://www.grammarmudge.cityslide.com/articles/article/1029424/8972.htm

Present perfect tense indicates two types of continuing action – action that began in the past and is now finished or action that began in the past and continues in the present.

> Professor Jones has written a book on the mating habits of zebras. (The continuing action that began in the past the writing of the book – is completed.) <---if i use had, what would the sentence mean? would it mean that he doesnt write anymore? , if i use has does it mean that sometime in the future he might write again?

> He has adored her ever since the day they met. (The continuing action – adoring her – began in the past, with the implication that it continues in the present.) <--if i use "had" would the sentence mean?
 

MikeNewYork

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jack said:
I mean like examples on asking questions, do i use have or had?

like if i asked these questions:
Have you seen Kill Bill? <--does this mean,i dont care when he seen it?
Had you seen kill bill? <---does this mean, i want to know the exact time of when he saw it?

do i use have or had? How do i know which one to use?

Have you seen "Kill Bill"? This asks if the person has see it yet, at any time prior to the present.

Had you seen "Kill Bill"? This should contain a past time reference, but that may be understood from a previous statement.

For example:

A: I had to write an essay last week about a gory movie. I couldn't think of one.
B: Had you seen "Kill Bill" (before you were in that position)?

Remember that past perfect is used to indicate that something happened before something else in the past.

"Had you started studying yet? <--is this even correct? so when i ask questionss, i can use had without using the past perfect rules? like this questions im asking doesn't have a subsequent event to it or anything?

"Have you started studying yet?"
What difference does it make when i ask questions using "had" or "have" ? when would i use "had" and "have" when asking questions?

I wouldn't use "yet" with the past perfect.
Had you started studying before the dog ate your book?
 

jack

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Had you seen "Kill Bill"? This should contain a past time reference, but that may be understood from a previous statement.

Thanks Mike, I had heard people using "had" like that before but i did not understand why. <---did i use "had" correctly b/c i am talking about 2 past tense? Or should it be have b/c [but i did not understand why. ] can be written as another sentence?

I still need help on my 2nd last post thanks.




http://www.geocities.com/gwyni_99/prfgreen.html

Walter had been taking Spanish lessons since he was in high school, so he should have been pretty good. <-- i don't get this? "since he was in high school" isn't that a unspecific time? shouldn't they use "have"? If i used have what difference would it make?

*Remember that past perfect is used to indicate that something happened before something else in the past. <--i don't see the difference events in that "Walter" sentece?
 

MikeNewYork

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jack said:
Had you seen "Kill Bill"? This should contain a past time reference, but that may be understood from a previous statement.

Thanks Mike, I had heard people using "had" like that before but i did not understand why. <---did i use "had" correctly b/c i am talking about 2 past tense? Or should it be have b/c [but i did not understand why. ] can be written as another sentence?

I still need help on my 2nd last post thanks.

Yes, you used "had" correctly there. It means that you had heard this usage before you read my message. You could also have used "have". Then it would mean that have heard that usage at sime time in the past.
 

jack

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http://www.geocities.com/gwyni_99/prfgreen.html

Walter had been taking Spanish lessons since he was in high school, so he should have been pretty good. <-- i don't get this? "since he was in high school" isn't that a unspecific time? shouldn't they use "have"? If i used have what difference would it make?

*Remember that past perfect is used to indicate that something happened before something else in the past. <--i don't see the different events in that "Walter" sentence?

Same with this sentence, i don't see the different events
The man had been waiting to see a doctor for two hours.
Can you explain why did they use had? and not have?
 

MikeNewYork

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jack said:
http://www.geocities.com/gwyni_99/prfgreen.html

Walter had been taking Spanish lessons since he was in high school, so he should have been pretty good. <-- i don't get this? "since he was in high school" isn't that a unspecific time? shouldn't they use "have"? If i used have what difference would it make?

You have to look at the rest of the paragraph. It sounds as if the entire story is set in the past. Once one is in the past, then things that occurred before the time of the story, would be in the past perfect. If the story were in the present, we would say, "Walter has been taking Spanish lessons since he was in high school, so he should be pretty good."

Now, imagine that someone is talking about their friend Walter in the past tense.

Walter I went to Mexico ten years ago. We were walking down the street looking for a place to eat. Walter walked up to a guy on the street and spoke Spanish to the man. The man became very angry and Walter was shocked. After all, Walter had been taking Spanish lessons since he was in high school and he should have been pretty good. As it turned out, instead of asking about a restaurant, Walter had mistakenly propositioned the man.

The entire story is set a time ten years ago. Everything was ten years ago, except Walter's Spanish lessons, which began a time prior to ten years ago. So the "has been taking" became "had been taking" and the "should be pretty good" became "should have been pretty good".

Same with this sentence, i don't see the different events
The man had been waiting to see a doctor for two hours.
Can you explain why did they use had? and not have?

Again, the story is set in the past, and the man began waiting before the time reference of the story.
 

jack

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woohooo, thanks for the clear explanation. I get it now:p

a)I filled up the gas two times this month.
b)I have filled up the gas two times this month.

What is the difference between a & b?
 
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