Have got vs Have gotten

Ali1002

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"They usually will give it to you if you've gotten to know them a little beforehand". In this sentence, what is the meaning of 'Have gotten'? Does it mean 'have', as 'have got' or not?
 

emsr2d2

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"have gotten" is used in AmE as the simple past of "have/have got". In this phrase, the present perfect of "to get to know" (a set phrase) is used.
 

Charlie Bernstein

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Yes. In American English, "have got" usually means "must": You have got to see the new Star Wars movie. It's great!"
 

GoesStation

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Yes. In American English, "have got" usually means "must": You have got to see the new Star Wars movie. It's great!"
I think have got, usually contracted to -'ve got, means to have much more often than must.

If you're talking about the uncontracted form, you may well be right.
 

Ali1002

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I think have got, usually contracted to -'ve got, means to have much more often than must.

If you're talking about the uncontracted form, you may well be right.
I don't think that there is any difference between "you have got" and "you've got". Am I wrong?
 

GoesStation

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I don't think that there is any difference between "you have got" and "you've got". Am I wrong?

There are some contexts where most speakers would not use the contracted form or would be less likely to use it. We nearly always contract the verb when you've got means you possess, [/I]and most American English speakers never contract you have in that meaning.

We may avoid the contraction to add emphasis: You have
got a point,
for one example, or Charlie's example, You have got to be kidding!
 
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