Have had

Status
Not open for further replies.

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Are these correct and what do they mean?

1. You guys should have had this guy killed.
2. You guys should have had killed him.
3. You guys should have killed him.
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
5. You need to watch what you say.

Yhe others are all at the wrong time.;-)
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Scenario:

A: "You have a game at 6:00 today," said John.

B: Chris calls me and asks, "Why didn't you show up today?".

Do I reply back with:

1. They called me yesterday and they told me I had to play a game today and I thought it was in the evening.
2. They called me yesterday and they told me I have to play a game today and I thought it was in the evening.

Which one do I use 'had' or 'have"? I do you know?
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
They called me yesterday and told me I had to play a game but I thought it was in the evening.


I'm not sure about your use of 'today'- it doesn't go with the original sentence, which you say was said yesterday.;-)
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
I'm not sure about your use of 'today'- it doesn't go with the original sentence, which you say was said yesterday.

I don't get it. So 'today' is wrong? Why? I'm trying to say they called me yesterday and they said I had a game today (today as in the moment I'm geting the call).
1. They called me yesterday and they told me I had to play a game today and I thought it was in the evening.

Why is this one wrong?
2. 1. They called me yesterday and they told me I have to play a game today and I thought it was in the evening.

Is this right?
3. They called me yesterday and they said, "I have to play a game tommorow", and I thought it was in the evening.

Are my quotations and commas right?
4. 3. They called me yesterday and they said, "I have to play a game tommorow", and I thought it was in the evening.
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
jack said:
Why is this one wrong?
2. They called me yesterday and they told me I have to play a game today and I thought it was in the evening.

According to the dialogue that goes with sentence 2. , the game is over, so 'had', past tense, not 'have' present tense.

jack said:
Is this right?
3. They called me yesterday and they said, "I have to play a game tomorrow", and I thought it was in the evening.

Since it's direct speech, you need to change "I" to "You", like this, ...they said, "You, Jack, have to play a game today/tomorrow,"....
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
I seee, thanks.

Are these correct? I have 'before' here, so do I use 'haven't' or 'hadn't'? How do you know?

1. But I haven't used it before.
2. But I had’t used it before.
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
tdol said:
5. You need to watch what you say.

Yhe others are all at the wrong time.;-)

Why aren't these correct? I don't understand.
1. You need to watch what you have said.
2. You need to watch what you had said.
3. You need to watch what you said.

Why is this one correct?
4. You need to watch what you say.
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
What's wrong with these ones? I can't use past tense?

1. You need to watch what you have said.
2. You need to watch what you had said.
3. You need to watch what you said.
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
1. You need to watch what you have said. :(
2. You need to watch what you had said. :(
3. You need to watch what you said. :(
4. You need to watch what you say. :D

Sentence 4. means, You need to be careful about the words you (are going to) use and the meaning they (will) convey. (Future) :lol:
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Can you tell me what the other ones mean so I can understand why is it wrong. Thanks.

1. You need to watch what you have said.
2. You need to watch what you had said.
3. You need to watch what you said.
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
It's a bit late to be giving advice like this- it has to be given before the event, not after. Afterwards, say 'you shouldn't have said that'.;-)
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
jack said:
Can you tell me what the other ones mean so I can understand why is it wrong. Thanks.

1. You need to watch what you have said.
2. You need to watch what you had said.
3. You need to watch what you said.

'need to' is a modal; it means, it's necessary that you do something, you are obligated to do something. 'necessary' and 'obligated' make reference to the Present and the Future, not the Past.
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Scenario:

We're talking about something in the past and she always gets her way and stuff and I said to the other person:

Do I reply back with:
1. I just let her had it.
2. I just let her have it.

Which one do I use? I think #2 is correct, but why 'have' and not 'had'?
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
#2 is correct- it's an infinitive without 'to' and doesn't show tense.;-)
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
tdol said:
#2 is correct- it's an infinitive without 'to' and doesn't show tense.;-)

So #1 is incorrect? #2, How do I know that it's an infinitive without 'to'? How can I test this? What are some words that I can add in to test it?
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
jack said:
How can I test this?

I just let them have it. (OK)

Note that, 'have' is a verb and 'let' is a verb. Within a single sentence, such as the one above, there can only be one main verb (i.e., only one tense-carrying verb).

I just let them had it. (Not OK)

Both 'let' and 'had' carry tense. 'let' carries tense and 'had' carries tense.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top