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jack

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Apr 24, 2004
Are these correct and what do they mean?

1. You guys should have had this guy killed.
2. You guys should have had killed him.
3. You guys should have killed him.
 

jack

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Apr 24, 2004
What do these mean?

Let's say I was writing a review for a product, which one would I use?

1. I bought a new Epson printer to replace my old one whose heads had clogged and the new one is a great printer.
2. I bought a new Epson printer to replace my old one whose heads have clogged and the new one is a great printer.
 
T

TheMadBaron

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^ Both are correct. Which one you would use might depend on what your intentions are towards the old printer....

If you plan to repair the old printer and continue using it, or to sell it, you might say you're not using it now because the heads have clogged, or the heads are clogged.

If you've given up on the thing and thrown it away, that would be because the heads had clogged, or the heads were clogged.

jack said:
Are these correct? I have 'before' here, so do I use 'haven't' or 'hadn't'? How do you know?

1. But I haven't used it before.
2. But I had’t used it before.
Both are correct, depending on context.... they have different meanings.

Haven't used it before means just what it says.... as of now, you haven't used it.

'Hadn't used it before', however, refers to something you hadn't used at the time you are referring to, but which you have used since then.

Example.... as of today, I have never used a gromble, though I bought one yesterday, and I plan to use it tomorrow. I used a wemble yesterday for the first time ever. So....

I'm quite exited about using my new gromble tomorrow. I haven't used it before.

Last week, I was excited about using my wemble, as I hadn't used it before. Frankly, it was a big disapointment. :(
 

jack

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Apr 24, 2004
Are these correct? If not, why? What do these mean?
1. I was an idiot to think she had changed.
2. I was an idiot to think she have changed.
3. I am an idiot to think she had changed.
4. I am an idiot to think she have changed.

What do these mean?
5. I never have been there before.
6. I have never been there before.
7. I never was there before.
8. I was never there before.
 
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Casiopea

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2. and 4. are not OK. 'have' lacks tense, and yet 'she' is a subject, so the verb should have tense, right?


2. I was an idiot to think she have changed.
4. I am an idiot to think she have changed.


6. and 8. are OK. 'never', a frequency adverb, comes after the auxiliary verb. :up: That's a rule.


6. I have never been there before. (OK)
8. I was never there before.(OK)


5. and 7. are not OK. The frequency adverb comes before the auxiliary. :down: That's not the rule.

5. I never have been there before. ('never' is heavily stressed)
7. I never was there before. ('never' is heavily stressed)

Some speakers, though, might use the structure above (i.e., place the adverb in a more prominent position in the sentence) so as to add emphasis to 'never'.
 

jack

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Apr 24, 2004
Thanks.
2. and 4. are not OK. 'have' lacks tense, and yet 'she' is a subject, so the verb should have tense, right?


2. I was an idiot to think she have changed.

4. I am an idiot to think she have changed.
I still don't really get why are these wrong? Especially #4.
 

Casiopea

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jack said:
Thanks.


2. I was an idiot to think she have changed.

4. I am an idiot to think she have changed.
I still don't really get why are these wrong? Especially #4.
To HAVE
I have
You have
She has
He has
It has
They have

I was an idiot to think (that) she had changed. (Past)
I am an idiot to think (that) she has changed. (Present)
I am an idiot to think (that) she had changed. ('am' = General fact)
 

jack

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Apr 24, 2004
Are these correct? If not, why?
1. He had an awesome time when he graduated.
2. He have an awesome time when he graduated.

3. He had seen that before when he graduated.
4. He have seen that before when he graduated.
 

Casiopea

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If he graduated in the past, then he had an awesome time in the past.

1. He had an awesome time when he graduated. (Past + Past) OK
2. He has an awesome time when he graduated. (Present + Past) Not OK

3. He had seen that before when he graduated. (Past + Past) OK
4. He has seen that before when he graduated. (Present + Past) Not OK
 

jack

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Apr 24, 2004
4. He has seen that before when he graduated. (Present + Past) Not OK
Why is it wrong? Doesn't this mean ‘He have seen that before when He graduated and now He remembers it?

Or
Des it mean 'He have seen that before when he graduated and now he still sees it.' which is wrong?
How do I know which one does it mean?

Are these correct? If not, why?
1. I had never met him before until now.
2. I have never met him before until now.

3. I have not seen him before until now.
4. I had not seen him before until now.

 
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Casiopea

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jack said:
4. He has seen that before when he graduated. Why is it wrong? Doesn't this mean ‘He have seen that before when He graduated and now He remembers it? Or does it mean 'He have seen that before when he graduated and now he still sees it.' which is wrong? How do I know which one does it mean?


Firstly, He have is incorrect. Let's get the number agreement working: It should be He has. Secondly, 'have seen' (present perfect) and 'graduated' (simple past) are not compatible:

He has seen that in the past when he graduated. (Not OK)
He has seen that before. (OK)
The first time he saw it was when he graduated. (OK)

1. I had never met him before (1st event), until now (2nd event). OK
2. I have never met him before (1st event), until now (2nd event). Not OK
3. I have not seen him before, until now. Not OK
4. I had not seen him before, until now. OK


 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Are these correct? If not, why?

What do these mean?
1. I have heard people say that.
2. I have heard people saying that.
3. I have heard people said that.

4. I never had this problem. (past?)
5. I never have this problem. (Fact?)

6. I never had this problem before. (past?)
7. I never have this problem before. (fact? This is correct, right? And this is wrong 'I never have this problem before until now.' right?)
 

Casiopea

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1. I have heard people say that. (OK; Fact)
2. I have heard people saying that... (OK; Add to it, though)
3. I have heard people said that. (Not OK; 'have' is not compatible with 'said')
4. I never had this problem. (Try, have never had)
5. I never have this problem. (OK; Fact)
6. I never had this problem before. (Try, have never had)
7. I never have this problem before. (Try, never had ... before) Past

When, for example, "I" and "have" are contracted to "I've", the final sound [v] is often pronounced as [f], which makes it difficult to hear, so it may sound as if the speaker is saying, "I never", when in actuality s/he is saying, "I[f] never", meaning "I've never":

I have never => I've never => I[v] never ~ I[f] never, which sounds like "I never" :cool:
 

jack

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Apr 24, 2004
3. I have heard people said that. (Not OK; 'have' is not compatible with 'said')
Why Can't I use 'said'? Can you explain it to me? Thanks. I can do this but I can't use 'said' for the one above?:
1. I think he said that. (correct)
2. I thought he says that. (incorrect)


4. I never had this problem. (Try, have never had)
6. I never had this problem before. (Try, have never had)
These are not wrong right?
3. I have never had this problem before. ('Try, have never had' How come I can use 'have never had' when 'before' is there? Doesn't it mean I don't have this problem before? Not now I do?)

7. I never have this problem before. (Try, never had ... before) Past
The one above is wrong for sure right?
I have never => I've never => I[v] never ~ I[f] never, which sounds like "I never"
This doesn't mean it is wrong if I use 'I never' right? Or does it mean 'I (have) never' where 'have' is omitted?)
 
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Casiopea

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2. I thought he says that. (incorrect)
=> Should be Past 'thought' and Past 'said'

3a. I have never had this problem before. (OK)
3b. I've never had this problem before. (OK)
3c. I'[f] never had this problem before. (OK)
3d. I never have liver. (OK. I never eat liver.)
3e. I have never had liver (before). (OK. I have never eaten liver before.)
 

jack

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Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Thanks.

3. I have heard people said that. (Not OK; 'have' is not compatible with 'said')
Why can't I use 'said' for the one above? It works here:
1. I think he said that. (How come 'think' is compatible with 'said' but the one above doesn't work?)
 

Casiopea

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jack said:
Thanks.

Why can't I use 'said' for the one above? It works here:
1. I think he said that. (How come 'think' is compatible with 'said' but the one above doesn't work?)
One of these doesn't belong: (Can you see the pattern? :cool: )

have heard (Present Perfect)
said (Simple Past)

think (Simple Present)
said (Simple Past)
 
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