"He got lost" (?)

GeneD

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There are times when your interlocutor suddenly stops following you (that is, they don't understand you). They either got tired or you are simply too far from one another in some way. (For instance, you're an astronaut, they're a football player.) They keep on smiling but the overall expression of their face shows they're not with you now. How can I describe this? In Russian, we would probably say something like "He got lost". Is the latter possible in English?

And it looks funny sometimes. I think there must be some funny expressions for this. Are there? :)
 
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GeneD

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Who is supposed to make that comment, you or a third person?
I'd like to know both options (if they are different for the first and third persons). :)
 

teechar

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Try:
You seem/he seems a bit lost.
 

emsr2d2

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I'd probably snap my fingers in front of their face and say "Hellooooo! Are you still with me?"
If I were the one whose concentration had wandered off, when I came back to the conversation, I'd say "Sorry. I was in a little world of my own!" (BrE)
 

Tarheel

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I'd probably snap my fingers in front of their face and say "Hellooooo! Are you still with me?"
If I were the one whose concentration had wandered off, when I came back to the conversation, I'd say "Sorry. I was in a little world of my own!" (BrE)

American English too.
 

Rover_KE

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If I were the one whose concentration had wandered off, when I came back to the conversation, I'd say "Sorry. I was in a little world of my own!" (BrE)
Alternatively: 'Sorry. I was miles away'.
 

Charlie Bernstein

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There are times when your interlocutors suddenly stops following you (that is, they don't understand you). They either got tired or you are simply too far from one another in some way. (For instance, you're an astronaut, they're football players.) They keep on smiling but the overall expressions their faces show they're not with you now. How can I describe this? In Russian, we would probably say something like "He got lost". Is the latter possible in English?

Yes. You've lost them.

And it looks funny sometimes. I think there must be some funny expressios for this. Are there? :)

I can't think of any off-hand.

In each sentence, eiither make your object plural and use plural pronouns, or make your object singular and use singular verbs. Don't shift back and forth. So, for interlocutor, use he, she, him, her, his, and hers. For interlocutors, use they, them, their, and theirs.

If a parenthetical expression is inside the sentence, it's not capitalized and the period goes outside. If it's its own sentence, it's capitalized and the period is inside.
 

GeneD

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In each sentence, eiither make your object plural and use plural pronouns, or make your object singular and use singular verbs. Don't shift back and forth. So, for interlocutor, use he, she, him, her, his, and hers. For interlocutors, use they, them, their, and theirs.
Thanks, Charlie. I've followed your advice and made some changes in the first post, but I haven't changed everything you advised. I'll explain it. The problem is, I'd like to use the word "interlocutor" in its singular form so that it doesn't seem that I'm describing a group of people. Initially I used "he" as a substitute for the "interlocutor", then changed it to "he or she" and then gave it up because it sounded awkward to me and started another thread where I asked if it's possible to avoid the "he/she" expression (https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/threads/257511-Avoiding-quot-he-she-quot-expressions). So you can see it's a long story. :-D I've used the pattern being advised in that thread, and I was warned that it's not accepted as 100% correct by some people, especially editors. :)
 
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