He has been to New York, in which his brother studies at a college.

Status
Not open for further replies.

wotcha

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2010
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
Korean
Home Country
South Korea
Current Location
South Korea
"He has been to New York, in which his brother studies at a college."


Is the above sentence grammatical?

I mean is it ok to put a comma before a preposition and a relative pronoun?
 

probus

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 7, 2011
Member Type
Native Language
English
Home Country
Canada
Current Location
Canada
There are no universally accepted rules about the use of commas. The style manuals of highly respected journals have various rules.

For myself, I would use the comma in your example, but I would say where rather than in which. Also, you should use the present continuous tense is studying rather than the simple present studies.
 

Raymott

VIP Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
English
Home Country
Australia
Current Location
Australia
There are no universally accepted rules about the use of commas. The style manuals of highly respected journals have various rules.
I have to disagree about your first sentence here on a technicality. There are some universally accepted rules, but there is no one collection of rules which is accepted universally.

"He has been to New York, where his brother studies at a college."
In this case, I'd say the comma is mandatory. Are there any style manuals that don't suggest a comma before a non-defining clause?
"He has been to a city where his brother studies at a college." Does anyone suggest a comma before a defining clause?

I thought this rule was close enough to being universal.

 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top