Hearing and listening or hear and listen

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Mariaeuge14

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Hi:

When to use hearing or listening?
I heard what she said. She was listening carefully. Are you listening to me?, Can you hear me?. I really don't know what is the difference between these two words. Thanks
 

RonBee

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It's a little complicated. Listening is a conscious process. I can hear someone without listening to them. On the other hand, "I hear you" is a way for someone to say he understands what is being said.

:)
 

Casiopea

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PAT: Are you listening to me?
SAM: Yes. I hear you.

Listening goes out, towards the object you're listening to.
Listening involves an action on your part. Use -ing.

Hearing comes in, towards you.
Hearing does not involve an action on your part. Don't use -ing.

:D
 

Tdol

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You can occasionally use -ing with 'hear', but the meaning is slightly different:

I've been hearing a number of rumours about him having an affair with a colleague.
;-)
 

valtango

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to hear or to listen

I think the difference between to hear and to listen is this.
To listen to someone you have to give them your attention.
To hear them you don't.
 

Tdol

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I agree. ;-)
 

Casiopea

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Re: to hear or to listen

valtango said:
To listen to someone you have to give them your attention. To hear them you don't.

Nice. :) It gives a whole new meaning to "hearing" :D

Maud: Did you hear what I said!?
Bob: Yup. I'm hearing you.

:D
 
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