'hone' - do you use this word?

Romeo4755

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Dear friends,
I've had a discussion if the word 'hone' is quite natural in today's language.
Example: The more you hone your skills today, the better you will be at them tomorrow.
I would say here exercise/ develop/ employ/ exploit (or whatever).
'hone' seemes old-fashioned or pompous to me. I d like to know your opinion.
Thanks.
 

GoesStation

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It's not terribly common but there's nothing old-fashioned - and certainly nothing pompous - about it.
 

emsr2d2

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I use it in phrases like "hone your/my/his/her/their skills". Come to think of it, I don't think I use it in any other context.
 

Skrej

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It's also relatively common to refer to honing edged tools, if you have occasion to work with them.

It's fairly common as a noun as well in such contexts. In fact, I recently purchased a set of diamond hones that has proved well worth the investment.
 
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bubbha

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"hone" means "sharpen". Picture someone sharpening a blade on a stone: that is honing. So "hone your skills" means "sharpen your skills" or "refine your skills".

It's not pompous or old-fashioned in my opinion. It's also not uncommon. It's a normal word.

Sometimes people misuse the word, saying "hone in" when they should more properly say "home in" (e.g. "to home in on a target").
 

Romeo4755

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Thank you so much for you opinions, dear people. )) I didn't know the expression is so popular.
I lost my password and couldn't thank you earlier, sorry for that.
 

Tdol

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People also use hone in on, although purists prefer home in on. It may not be very common outside a few contexts, but it is used both naturally and unnaturally, though those using it don't know that they're using it this way, in modern English.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hone in
 
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