Hot Dog

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Tdol

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I recently read that the term 'hot dog' came from the 1904 St Louis World's Fair. Apparently, there was a rumour that some of the performers there ate dog, and that local dogs had disappeared, so the vendors started calling...

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Source: TDOL's Language Archive
 

Casiopea

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hot dog - "sausage on a split roll," c.1890, popularized by cartoonist T.A. Dorgan. It is said to echo a 19c. suspicion (occasionally justified) that sausages contained dog meat.

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Cooler

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Here is another story. The hot dog was called the frankfurter in its home country Germany. It was named after Frankfurt, a German city. Frankfurters were first sold in the united states in the 1860s, where people called them "dachshund sausages". A dachshund is a dog from Germany with a very long body and short legs. One day in 1906 a newspaper cartoonist named Tad Dorgan went to a baseball game. When he saw the men with the dachshund sausages, he got an idea for a cartoon. The next day at the newspaper office he drew a bun with a dachshund inside--not a dachshund sausage, but a dachshund. he didn't know how to spell dachshund. Under the cartoon, he wrote "Get you hot dogs!" The cartoon was a senstion, and so was the new name.
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Casiopea

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Cooler said:
Here is another story. The hot dog was called the frankfurter in its home country Germany. It was named after Frankfurt, a German city. Frankfurters were first sold in the united states in the 1860s, where people called them "dachshund sausages". A dachshund is a dog from Germany with a very long body and short legs. One day in 1906 a newspaper cartoonist named Tad Dorgan went to a baseball game. When he saw the men with the dachshund sausages, he got an idea for a cartoon. The next day at the newspaper office he drew a bun with a dachshund inside--not a dachshund sausage, but a dachshund. he didn't know how to spell dachshund. Under the cartoon, he wrote "Get you hot dogs!" The cartoon was a senstion, and so was the new name.
:wink:

Is nothing in America sacred? :lol:

Check out the etymology for hamburger. :D :wink:
 

twostep

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May 10, 2004
[quote

Is nothing in America sacred? :lol:

Check out the etymology for hamburger. :D :wink:[/quote]

I am afraid not. What makes this even more scary - check the ingredients list of a hot dog and your powder compact.
 

Tdol

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