[Grammar] How can present perfect describe my status

Ab.m

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I've read before that present perfect describes my current status could anyone please explain this concept ?
For example when i say " I've written something " how can this describe my status
 

jutfrank

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I have a status of having written something.
 

Rover_KE

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'I have a status of having written something' sounds unnatural to me.

I can't imagine why anybody would say that.
 

Ab.m

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It would be more appropriate to say that we can use the present perfect to talk about the current status/state (of something/someone

In your sentence, the letter is in a completed state.
Thank you.
but completed state means that it's a finished action, or it means that the letter is ready or available now ?
 

GoesStation

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If you say "I've written a letter," the act of writing is finished. You are no longer writing.
 

andrewg927

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Without further context, "I've written a letter" and "I wrote a letter" pretty much mean the same thing.
 

andrewg927

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They are rarely interchangeable in BrE.

I said nothing about interchangeability. I just said they mean the same thing (or at least can mean the same thing) without further context.
 

andrewg927

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Again, I never said they meant exactly the same thing. You are putting words in my mouth. I totally understand the differences between past simple and present perfect. I'm pretty sure I don't need a refresher for that. But as you insisted, here is one case where any differences are minuscule. "I wrote a letter to Tom yesterday. I'm ready to send it now". "I have written a letter to Tom. I'm ready to send it now".
 
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