Hyphens introduced at line breaks

kadioguy

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[FONT=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]In the [/FONT]SOED6's abbreviations and symbols, it says:
[FONT=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]
[/FONT][FONT=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]The printing of hyphens [/FONT]

[FONT=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]Hyphens introduced at line breaks in words or formulae not otherwise hyphenated are printed "~". The regular form "-" represents a hyphen which would occur in any circumstance in the text.

[/FONT]https://i.imgur.com/zhsDbHm.jpg
[FONT=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]----------

[/FONT]'Hyphens introduced at line breaks in words or formulae not otherwise hyphenated are printed "~"'

[FONT=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]What doe it mean?



[/FONT]
 

Rover_KE

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I have never seen the swung dash used like that and advise students not to use it.
 

SoothingDave

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Thanks for introducing the term "swung dash." I never heard it before.
 

GoesStation

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The extract probably comes from a technical text in which it's important for the reader to know whether a word or formula that wraps to a following line is supposed to contain a hyphen.

The image doesn't show a swung dash (which I've always called a tilde). It shows an angled hyphen.
 

bubbha

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I've never in my life seen any-
thing other than a hyphen be-
ing used for a line-break.

I advise only using a hy-
phen for a line-break.
 

kadioguy

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I have got some examples. :)

O1hRn58.jpg



ijwGf7g.jpg
 

emsr2d2

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I've never noticed such a dash before. If I stumbled across one, I'm not sure I would even notice that it's at a slightly different angle from a standard hyphen. I might even think it was a slight printing error.
 
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bubbha

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I've never noticed such a dash before. If I stumbled across one, I'm not sure I would even notice that it's at a slightly different angle from a standard hyphen. I might even think it was a slight printing error.
I would consider it a peculiarity of the font.
 

Rover_KE

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I can't remember the last time I split a word at the end of a line. When I'm typing text, the machine decides when to start a new line, and when I'm handwriting a letter I start a new line if I don't think I can get all of the next word on the current one.
 
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