[Grammar] I am the first child in my family to attend college.

ambitious-girl

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Hello all,

Are these two pairs sentences equivalent?

A: I am the first child in my family to attend college.

B: I am the first child in my family who attend college.


A: The guest on our show is the youngest golfer who wins the Open.

B:The guest on our show is the youngest golfer to win the Open.


Can the definition below be the only reason why we use "adjective clause + to-infinitive" ?

"If the subject is the same in both clauses, you usually use a ‘to’-infinitive clause. If the subject is different, you must use a ‘that’-clause."
 

GoesStation

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Are these two pairs sentences equivalent?

A: I am the first child in my family to attend college.:tick:

B: I am the first child in my family who has attended college.:tick:


A: The guest on our show is the youngest golfer who wins the Open.:cross: (He's the youngest golfer to have won the Open.)

B:The guest on our show is the youngest golfer to win the Open.:tick:
See above.
 

ambitious-girl

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Thanks GoesStation.
I still don't know where we can use this pattern. It seems that "adjective clause + to-infinitive" can only be used in specific situations with specific meanings. However, I don't know what those situation are.
I would greatly appreciate it if you kindly could give me some sources relate to this rule for self study.
 
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