I can come now

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bmo

Senior Member
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Jul 24, 2003
I can come to the party, so
1. please add my name to your list?
2. please put me down on your list?
3. Please put me down in your list?

Which one/ones are correct?

Thanks.

BMO
 

Casiopea

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I can come to the party, so
1. please add my name to your list? (OK)
2. please put me down on your list? (OK)
3. Please put me down in your list? (Not OK)

'put down' means, write. When we write, we write on paper and in a book.

Please put me down in your book.

All the best,
 

Tdol

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Put me down on yourlist, but please don't put me down. ;-)
 

bmo

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Jul 24, 2003
Casiopea said:
'put down' means, write. When we write, we write on paper and in a book.

Please put me down in your book.

All the best,

Thanks to Casiopea and tdol, I was positive on the first one, leaned toward the second over the third, but now I am totally sure. Thanks. How come we say, "I read it in the newspaper, and there are dead rats in the streets?" I thought "in" is inside, and "on" is on the surface.

BMO
 

RonBee

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bmo said:
Casiopea said:
'put down' means, write. When we write, we write on paper and in a book.

Please put me down in your book.

All the best,

Thanks to Casiopea and tdol, I was positive on the first one, leaned toward the second over the third, but now I am totally sure. Thanks. How come we say, "I read it in the newspaper, and there are dead rats in the streets?" I thought "in" is inside, and "on" is on the surface.

BMO

We also say, "I read it in a book" or talk about dancing in the streets. Sometimes the logic of usage is diffcult or impossible to explain. (If anybody has an explanation tho, Cas does.)

:)
 

Tdol

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When we say 'in the street' we don't just mean the surface, but the area within the boundaries of the street, IMO. I'd say we say 'in a field' forthe same reason. :)
 

RonBee

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tdol said:
When we say 'in the street' we don't just mean the surface, but the area within the boundaries of the street, IMO. I'd say we say 'in a field' forthe same reason. :)

Good explanation!

:D
 

RonBee

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You're quite welcome.

:wink:
 

Casiopea

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bmo said:
How come we say, "I read it in the newspaper, and there are dead rats in the streets?" I thought "in" is inside, and "on" is on the surface.

A newpaper is like a book. Between the front page and the back page of the newspaper there are pages inside, and hence "I read it in the newspaper." Also, newspapers are made up of columns and inside those columns words are written. The columns, like a street or a field, has two edges or boundaries. In the days of old, one stepped down into the streets and the fields, and hence the use of 'in the street' and 'in the field'.

All the best,
 
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