I decided no to ear more candy.

yi-ing

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  1. I have decided no to ear more candy.
  2. I decided no to ear more candy.

The first sentence implies that "I don't eat more candy" while the second suggests that "I didn't eat candy but these days I might going to eat more candies again".
Are my assumption OK?
 

Charlie Bernstein

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  1. I have decided not to ea​t more candy.
  2. I decided no​t to ea​t more candy.

The first sentence implies that "I don't eat more candy​," while the second suggests that "I didn't eat candy, but these days I might ​be eating more cand​y again".
Are my assumption​s OK?
Yes.

But keep in mind that that means you might not eat any less candy, either! Are you sure that's what you mean?

If you're quitting candy altogether, it's better to say: I have decided not to eat candy anymore.
 

yi-ing

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But keep in mind that that means you might not eat any less candy, either! Are you sure that's what you mean?
May I ask which sentence means that?
 

jutfrank

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May I ask which sentence means that?

Both.

Your sentences are incorrect and your assumptions are wrong (if I understand you correctly). Here are two correct interpretations of your sentence 1. It is not clear which one you mean.

I have decided not to eat any more candy.

This means that you have eaten some candy. You do not want more candy. We don't know for how long this wish applies. It's possible that you are talking about only today, for example. The word more relates to candy.

I have decided not to eat candy anymore.

This means that you want to give up eating candy indefinitely. Eating candy is a habit that you want to stop. The word anymore relates to the verb phrase eat candy.

The same difference applies to sentence 2, but this time, the use of the past tense places the act of deciding in the past, with no present relevance.

Maybe this thread will help you understand the difference of use between I decided and I have decided: https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/...perfect-and-past-simple?p=1467726#post1467726
 

emsr2d2

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Take care with your spelling. I was intrigued by your title (and your sentences) because I wanted to know how one can "ear candy".
 
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