I feel good now than before. Now I can pick things up bending over.

tufguy

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I feel good now than before. Now I can pick things up bending over.

Can I ask a doctor "Can I pick up something weighty bending over"?
 

tedmc

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Have you checked the meaning of "bend over" in a dictionary? It is a figure of speech.
 

GoesStation

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Review the comparative form of good. You should also remind yourself of the superlative form while you're at it.
 

GoesStation

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Weighty is not a good synonym for ​heavy.
 

Tdol

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Surely, you would bend down to pick something up, wouldn't you?
 

emsr2d2

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According the second sentence of post #1, you have already established that you are able to bend over and pick up heavy things. Isn't a bit late to ask your doctor if you can do it?
 

Lynxear

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Have you checked the meaning of "bend over" in a dictionary? It is a figure of speech.


Yes, it can be a figure of speech. However this is not the context that would mean anything but bending at the waist to touch the floor or as in this case bending at the waist to pick up a heavy object.
 

Lynxear

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I feel [STRIKE]good [/STRIKE] better now than before. Now I can pick things up by bending over.

Can I ask a doctor "Can I pick up something [STRIKE]weighty[/STRIKE] heavy by bending over"?

According the second sentence of post #1, you have already established that you are able to bend over and pick up heavy things. Isn't a bit late to ask your doctor if you can do it?

No emsr2d2, the first sentence establishes that the patient is better and can bend over and pick some things. But now the patient wants to know if he can pick up heavy things.

I can actually relate to this. I have had surgery where a 10 inch incision was made cutting through my stomach wall. After many weeks of recovery I almost felt normal but I was cautioned about lifting anything heavy. At some point I had to ask if my stomach was strong enough to handle heavy objects.
 

emsr2d2

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Fair point. I subconsciously added "weighty" to the second sentence having read it in the third.
 

tufguy

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Yes, it can be a figure of speech. However this is not the context that would mean anything but bending at the waist to touch the floor or as in this case bending at the waist to pick up a heavy object.

"Bending at the waist" can also be used in place of "Bend over". Am I correct?
 

tufguy

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Have you ever seen a normal person bend either forward or backward without bending at the waist? 'Bend over' is sufficient.

I had never heard "Bending at the waist" before that is why I asked you.
 

GoesStation

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"Bending at the waist" can also be used in place of "Bend over". Am I correct?
When you want to give your reader the image of someone with their back straight but leaning over from the waist, you can use that phrase. The young woman was bent over at the waist, her arms clasped around her calves and her hair hanging down to the ground, looking at the camera.
 

Lynxear

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Have you ever seen a normal person bend either forward or backward without bending at the waist? 'Bend over' is sufficient.



I have bent an elbow over a pint more than a few times. :)
 

emsr2d2

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The action of bringing a pint of beer/lager to your mouth involves bending the elbow. Lynxear made a little joke about the use of "bending" a part of the body without the waist being involved.
 
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