I grant you

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emsr2d2

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Not really. It means "I [reluctantly] agree that something you said, or alluded to, is true/correct".
 

Tdol

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I accept what you say/that you're right.
 

teechar

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It's a form of concession.
 

emsr2d2

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"Concession" as in "I concede that you are/you might be right".

Jane: What do you think of James in IT?
Sarah: I don't like him. He's arrogant and he never offers to make coffee!
Jane: True, but he's really good-looking and incredibly clever!
Sarah: OK, he's clever, I'll grant you, but good-looking?
Jane: I think so.
Sarah: He's just not my type, I guess.

(I used "I'll grant you" because that's what I'm more used to hearing in BrE but it has the same meaning as "I grant you".)
 

hhtt21

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"Concession" as in "I concede that you are/you might be right".

Jane: What do you think of James in IT?
Sarah: I don't like him. He's arrogant and he never offers to make coffee!
Jane: True, but he's really good-looking and incredibly clever!
Sarah: OK, he's clever, I'll grant you, but good-looking?
Jane: I think so.
Sarah: He's just not my type, I guess.

(I used "I'll grant you" because that's what I'm more used to hearing in BrE but it has the same meaning as "I grant you".)

But I'll grant you=I agree with you in the above, don't they?

Thank you.
 

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Sarah doesn't like the guy. It's not just a simple agreement. She would rather not say anything positive about him, but has to concede/grant that he is clever.
It's the connotation that's important, but I'll grant you that they do agree on this one point.
 

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But "I'll grant you"="I agree with you" in the above, [strike]don't they[/strike] doesn't it?
Yes, it does, but with the important nuance ems and Raymott pointed out.

The subject of that sentence is the phrase "I'll grant you", which is singular. Please remember to mark text you're discussing by setting it in italics or surrounding it with quotation marks. I'm getting tired of correcting these errors. :)
 

Tdol

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But I'll grant you=I agree with you in the above, don't they?

It's like I agree with you on that point, but (and the but is important as they person disagrees on other issues and very possibly the overall view the person has).
 

hhtt21

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It's like I agree with you on that point, but (and the but is important as they person disagrees on other issues and very possibly the overall view the person has).

Would you please explain the part "as they" in the above? Should not it have been " as the"?

​Thank you.
 

Tarheel

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It's a typo.
 
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