I have just been converted to Buddhism.

Tan Elaine

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If I have just become a Buddhist, can I say "I have just been converted to Buddhism."? or "I have just embraced Buddhism."? Is there any way to express this?

Thanks.
 

Rover_KE

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Yes - you have just expressed it.
 

Tan Elaine

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Yes - you have just expressed it.
Thanks, Rover.

Is there any difference between the sentences below or do they mean exactly the same?

"I have just been converted to Buddhism."
"I have just embraced Buddhism."
 

Rover_KE

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The first suggests that somebody was instrumental in your conversion.

The second implies that you made the decision for yourself.
 

emsr2d2

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Unless you were converted under duress (someone else can't really force you to change your religion), I'd use "I have just converted to Buddhism".
 

Lynxear

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To me, the first sentence, "I have just been converted to Buddhism." , is simply a statement of fact.

However, the second sentence, "I have just embraced Buddhism.", means that not only have you accepted this religion, but also you are really enthusiastic about this change.
 

andrewg927

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2 means at least to me an acceptance of a new faith. It doesn't necessarily mean you are really enthusiastic about it.
 

Phaedrus

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Footnote: There's no need for the present perfect. The simple past works fine here.

"I just converted to Buddhism."
"I recently converted to Buddhism."

"I just embraced Buddhism."
"I recently embraced Buddhism."

"I just became a Buddhist."
"I recently became a Buddhist."
 

Phaedrus

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Thanks, Piscean. I wanted to see if I'd get a response to that effect. So, does it sound strange or wrong to British speakers to say, for example, "I just ate dinner" instead "I have just eaten dinner"? On Google Books, the former tops the latter 558 to 101.
 

Phaedrus

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I would say "I have just had dinner".
I use "had" more with lunch than with dinner. I would say, "I just had lunch." :)
 
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