I need an AP out

kingston_123

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Bromley speaks on a phone:

Bromley: It's Bromley. I need an AP out to all city-district units from Wapping High Street to the A1203 Suspect’s an Asian male, 61 years of age, 5'8", 11 stone.

What is the meaning of "AP"?
Source: The Foreigner 2017
 

Rover_KE

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An All-Points Bulletin.

[click]

Bromley must have a background as a North American cop. Wapping High Street is in London and AP(B) is not used by UK police.
 
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GoesStation

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He certainly wouldn't report a weight in stone if he were American. I suspect that AP has a particular meaning in the context of the story.
 

emsr2d2

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Even in American films/TV, I think I've only heard it abbreviated to "an APB".
 

emsr2d2

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I think it is Auxiliary Police (no full stop here) but I am not completely sure.

I disagree. I am confident that Rover is right and that it's a shorter way of saying "APB". The rest of the sentence backs this up. The AP/APB needs to be broadcast to all the police units between (and including) the two locations given.

You omitted a full stop after "A1203".

It is an odd combination of phrases though. "AP/APB" is not used by the British police, nor do we have "city-district police", yet Wapping High Street and the A1203 are clearly in the UK.

Is Bromley an American police officer working in the UK?
 

GoesStation

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Is Bromley an American police officer working in the UK?
If he is, his reporting the suspect's weight in stone means he's very well integrated. Or maybe the screenwriter has an incomplete grasp of American dialect. That unit of weight is almost completely unknown over here, and even an American reading it from a report would be likely to pluralize it incorrectly as stones​. :)
 

Roman55

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I agree there's an unnatural mixture of BrE and AmE in this snippet, and my first reaction to the City-district part was the same as ems's. However, the A1203 is in East London and leads directly to the City, so maybe that's not so wrong after all. As for the AP, I think it should be APB although that seems to be losing ground to the BOLO. The weight in stones makes a nice change from having to divide the pounds by 14 or 2.2 to make sense of it.
 
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