I was happy to have helped him out of politeness and not lost my temper.

nininaz

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It is the first time I come across such structure. Could you please tell me why "to have helped" are used instead of "to help"?

Some days later, I got an email from that customer, who was so sorry that he apologized to me and expressed his appreciation of my courteousness. I was happy to have helped him out of politeness and not lost my temper. This gave me a great sense of achievement.
 

Matthew Wai

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The perfect infinitive 'to have helped' denotes that the helping happened before 'I was happy'.
 

Roman55

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It is the first time I come across such structure. I was happy to have helped him out of politeness and not lost my temper.

Where did you come across it? The part in bold is wrong.
 

nininaz

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Where did you come across it? The part in bold is wrong.
It was suggested by a native English teacher. :shock:
I wrote "I was happy to help him out of politeness...", but he added "I was happy to have helped him..."

What is the correct form?
 

jutfrank

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The sentence doesn't make a lot of sense.
 

nininaz

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The sentence doesn't make a lot of sense.
Which one? The following?
I was happy to help him out of politeness and not lost my temper. This gave me a great sense of achievement.
 

jutfrank

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I was happy to help him out of politeness and not lost my temper.

Were you really happy to help him? Or did you just do it out of politeness? And are you saying you were also happy that you didn't lose your temper? Why would you lose your temper? You said he had been quite apologetic.

Anyway, grammatically it should finish ...and not lose my temper.

Or:

I was happy to have helped him, and not to have lost my temper.
 
Last edited:

nininaz

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Were you really happy to help him? Or did you just do it out of politeness? And are you saying you were also happy that you didn't lose your temper? Why would you lose your temper? You said he had been quite apologetic.
At first he was a really bad-tempered customer. He shout at me and insulted me.

Here is almost full paragraph:

Finally, it turned out that there was something wrong with his own system. He acted as if nothing had happened. I also tried to act like his behaviour hadn't bothered me. Some days later, I got an email from that customer, who was so sorry that he apologized to me and expressed his appreciation of my courteousness. I was happy to have helped him out of politeness and not lost my temper. This gave me a great sense of achievement.
 

Matthew Wai

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to have helped him out of politeness and not lost my temper.
Could it mean 'to have helped him out of politeness and (to have) not lost my temper', where '​to have' can be omitted?
 

GoesStation

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Could it mean 'to have helped him out of politeness and (to have) not lost my temper', where '​to have' can be omitted?

Yes, though I'd say and not to have lost my temper.
 

Matthew Wai

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I was happy to have helped him politely without losing my temper.
 

yi-ing

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Yes, though I'd say and not to have lost my temper.
English is really a CRAZY and EXCITING language. The more I learn, the less I know.
I've learned a lot from this post.

Thank you all.
 

Raymott

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It is the first time I come across such structure [in English]
...
to have helped
Many of your questions have cognates in Italian, nininaz.
"I was happy to have helped. Ero felice di aver aiutato."
It might also help you to understand why "that" is wrong in the other question if you consider that "che" would be wrong in the same question in Italian. There are a lot of similarities that I think it would help you to think about.
 
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