I wasn't born at the time?

Ryan.

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Someone is talking about an event in 1960 and ask you whether you remember it or not and you want to say you were not born until later. what do you say? I wasn't born at the time?

Thanks.
 
Solution
I don't see a problem with saying "I wasn't born at the time".
"I wasn't born yet" is correct too.
There are lots of correct ways to say this. You could also say:
"I had not been born yet".

Ashraful Haque

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Offhand, no. (Context is always helpful.)
I was having a conversation about junk food craving at night. I asked the other person "What do you do at the time?"
I would normally say "What do you do at that time" but is 'at the time' also correct here?
 

5jj

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Tarheel

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I wonder why 'at the time' is wrong there but correct here- "I couldn't make it yesterday because I was at work at the time."
He was at work at the time his friend wanted him to come by. (Or something like that.)

I have no idea what the other one is supposed to mean. I can't even guess.
 

Tdol

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I was having a conversation about junk food craving at night. I asked the other person "What do you do at the time?"
I would normally say "What do you do at that time" but is 'at the time' also correct here?
These don't seem very natural to me. How about:

What do you do when you get these cravings?
 

Ashraful Haque

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These don't seem very natural to me. How about:
Since were were talking about night cravings, I thought it would be more natural not to say 'night cravings' again. The conversation went something like this:
A) I get night cravings every single night.
B) Yeah I get night cravings too.
A) And what do you do at the time?
 

emsr2d2

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Since were we were talking about night cravings, I thought it would be more natural not to say 'night cravings' again. The conversation went something like this:

A) I get night cravings every single night.
B) Yeah I get night cravings too.
A) And what do you do at the time?
The repetition of "night" in the first A) and then B) is awkward. This is a more natural dialogue. In reality, Jim would probably say what it is he craves.

Jim: I get cravings every single night.
Bob: Me too.
Jim: What do you do when it happens?
 

Tarheel

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Jim: I get cravings for pizza every night.
Bob: Seriously? Would you like some now?
Jim: I sure would!
Bob: I'll call the pizza place to have some delivered.
Jim: Great!
 

Tdol

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Since were were talking about night cravings, I thought it would be more natural not to say 'night cravings' again. The conversation went something like this:
A) I get night cravings every single night.
B) Yeah I get night cravings too.
A) And what do you do at the time?
You're trying to hammer your phrase into a number of contexts.
 
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