if I were you

Status
Not open for further replies.

navi tasan

Key Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
Persian
Home Country
Iran
Current Location
United States
Which is correct:
1-I'd fasten my seat-belt if I were you.
2-I'd fasten your seat-belt if I were you.
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
They do both make sense, but I'd use the second. This is a lovely question. Pity I haven't got a slick answer. ;-)
 

navi tasan

Key Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
Persian
Home Country
Iran
Current Location
United States
Thanks TDOL.
Your answer might not be "slick" (that could mean half a dozen things), but it's cool!
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
navi tasan said:
Which is correct:
1-I'd fasten my seat-belt if I were you.
2-I'd fasten your seat-belt if I were you.

I agree with TDOL that both are used. I prefer the "my" form. Once I am you, it will be my seatbelt.
 

navi tasan

Key Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
Persian
Home Country
Iran
Current Location
United States
That's the way I used it, but come to think of it, in certain cases TDOL's version works and ours doesn't:
"I'd listen to me if I were you."
Imagine the highly unlikely case where you want the other guy to fasten your belt, or...

I don't think this is an AE/BE thing though.
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
I think my answer would change each time I answered the question.;-)
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
navi tasan said:
That's the way I used it, but come to think of it, in certain cases TDOL's version works and ours doesn't:
"I'd listen to me if I were you."
Imagine the highly unlikely case where you want the other guy to fasten your belt, or...

I don't think this is an AE/BE thing though.

While it is a bit strange, there really isn't anything wrong with "I'd listen to me if I were you." Once you become him, you could listen to the "me" which would then be someone else. :wink:
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
"I'd listen to you if I were you."

A dangerous piece of advice, unless the other person is right. ;-)
 
T

Tombraiders

Guest
Well, if I were you, I'd become a double-head monster. I could listen to either me or you.

So:

I'd fasten my seatbelt if I were you -- I'd care for you.

I'd fasten your seatbelt if I were you -- I wouldn't care for you.

I'd listen to you if I were you -- you should listen to yourself

I'd listen to me if I were you -- you should listen to me
 

navi tasan

Key Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
Persian
Home Country
Iran
Current Location
United States
Precisely.
If I have got it right this is the way you do it (and it is definitely the way I do it):
I would fasten MY seat belt if I were you.
Here the meaning is: fasten YOUR seat belt.
I would listen to ME if I were you.
Here the meaning is; listen to ME

There is sort of a problem, isn't there?
The way we use it, the first person pronoun sometimes refers to the person the speaker is speaking to and sometimes to the speaker himself. The way TDOL uses it, "you" always means you.
I 'd fasten your seat belt if I were you.

But once again, I would say (or rather be told!) that context would make everything clear.
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
navi tasan said:
Precisely.
If I have got it right this is the way you do it (and it is definitely the way I do it):
I would fasten MY seat belt if I were you.
Here the meaning is: fasten YOUR seat belt.
I would listen to ME if I were you.
Here the meaning is; listen to ME

There is sort of a problem, isn't there?
The way we use it, the first person pronoun sometimes refers to the person the speaker is speaking to and sometimes to the speaker himself. The way TDOL uses it, "you" always means you.
I 'd fasten your seat belt if I were you.

But once again, I would say (or rather be told!) that context would make everything clear.

I see your point, but I don't see a problem. If I were you, your seat belt would be mine, but my words would still be the same. :wink:
 

navi tasan

Key Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
Persian
Home Country
Iran
Current Location
United States
I guess if you have a context you don't have a problem.
I think I am going to say "my" like I used to. If I meet TDOL in a bar (pub?), he'll recognize me! He'll go: "Hey! If you say "If I were you I'd drink MY whiskey more slowly" then you must either be Navi or Mike. And given your accent, you can only be Navi!!"
Mind you, in my language, we do say "my seat belt" too. Actually, I think the other version would be wrong.
Thanks for the "commas" question too.
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
navi tasan said:
I guess if you have a context you don't have a problem.
I think I am going to say "my" like I used to. If I meet TDOL in a bar (pub?), he'll recognize me! He'll go: "Hey! If you say "If I were you I'd drink MY whiskey more slowly" then you must either be Navi or Mike. And given your accent, you can only be Navi!!"
Mind you, in my language, we do say "my seat belt" too. Actually, I think the other version would be wrong.
Thanks for the "commas" question too.

You're welcome. I actually can see this TDOL's way as well. :wink:
 

navi tasan

Key Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
Persian
Home Country
Iran
Current Location
United States
So can I.
It is a good thing we can keep a thread going this long about something we agree upon!
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
navi tasan said:
So can I.
It is a good thing we can keep a thread going this long about something we agree upon!

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 
J

james_chew_84

Guest
navi tasan said:
Which is correct:
1-I'd fasten my seat-belt if I were you.
2-I'd fasten your seat-belt if I were you.

the best way to say it is. i'd would fasten the seat belt,if i were you.doubts solved :)
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
james_chew_84 said:
navi tasan said:
Which is correct:
1-I'd fasten my seat-belt if I were you.
2-I'd fasten your seat-belt if I were you.

the best way to say it is. i'd would fasten the seat belt,if i were you.doubts solved :)

It is the safest choice, at the very least. :D
 
J

james_chew_84

Guest
navi tasan said:
Precisely.
If I have got it right this is the way you do it (and it is definitely the way I do it):
I would fasten MY seat belt if I were you.
Here the meaning is: fasten YOUR seat belt.
I would listen to ME if I were you.
Here the meaning is; listen to ME

There is sort of a problem, isn't there?
The way we use it, the first person pronoun sometimes refers to the person the speaker is speaking to and sometimes to the speaker himself. The way TDOL uses it, "you" always means you.
I 'd fasten your seat belt if I were you.

But once again, I would say (or rather be told!) that context would make everything clear.


are you ppl dragging this on just for fun?.you would probably be talking in person when you say i would listen to me or you, if i were you.so, there is no need for pronouns when the conversation is about the both of you.Why not solve the problem by leaving the pronouns out.wouldn't it be easier to say i would listen, if i were you.well, if there's a third party involved you can say. i would listen to him if i were you and if it's a thing you can use "the "for example. i would fasten the seat-belt if i were you.
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
james_chew_84 said:
are you ppl dragging this on just for fun?.you would probably be talking in person when you say i would listen to me or you, if i were you.so, there is no need for pronouns when the conversation is about the both of you.Why not solve the problem by leaving the pronouns out.wouldn't it be easier to say i would listen, if i were you.well, if there's a third party involved you can say. i would listen to him if i were you and if it's a thing you can use "the "for example. i would fasten the seat-belt if i were you.

Yes, you've said that. It is a reasonable approach, but not the most common, IMO. :wink:
 
J

james_chew_84

Guest
MikeNewYork said:
james_chew_84 said:
are you ppl dragging this on just for fun?.you would probably be talking in person when you say i would listen to me or you, if i were you.so, there is no need for pronouns when the conversation is about the both of you.Why not solve the problem by leaving the pronouns out.wouldn't it be easier to say i would listen, if i were you.well, if there's a third party involved you can say. i would listen to him if i were you and if it's a thing you can use "the "for example. i would fasten the seat-belt if i were you.

Yes, you've said that. It is a reasonable approach, but not the most common, IMO. :wink:

what do you mean by not the most common?then, what do americans usually say?
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top