I'm going to London in two weeks

Ali1002

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Hi there. I don't understand the exact meaning of this sentence. "I'm going to London in two weeks". Does it mean that you're going to London two weeks later?
 

emsr2d2

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Yes. We use "in" that way a lot so you need to understand it that way.

If I say at 10pm "I'm going to bed in an hour", it means I am going to bed at 11pm.
If I say today "I'm going to London in two weeks", it means I am going on the 18th February.
 

jutfrank

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Don't say two weeks later. It's usually not correct English. Say in two weeks.
 

Rover_KE

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"I'm going to London in two weeks". Does it mean that [STRIKE]you're[/STRIKE] I'm going to London [STRIKE]two weeks later[/STRIKE] in two weeks?
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Ali1002

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I agree - in the context of Ali's original context-free sentence. However, two weeks later is fine elsewhere.

Thank you all! I have another question about this case. Is there any difference between "in" and "within" in this case? "I'm going to London within two weeks".
 

GoesStation

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Thank you all! I have another question about this case. Is there any difference between "in" and "within" in this case? "I'm going to London within two weeks".

In means two weeks from now. Within means any time between now and two weeks from now.
 

bubbha

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We use "in two weeks" in relation to now; we use "two weeks later" in relation to times that are not now.

"I will go to London in two weeks. I will go to Paris three weeks later. Therefore, I will be in Paris in five weeks."
 
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