in/at the end

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blacknomi

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Dear teachers,
I have one question to ask before I go to bed.



"in the end" and "at the end" do confused me at times.

  • at the beginning of June (OK)
    in the beginning of June (Not OK)
    in the middle of June (OK)
    at the middle of June (Not OK)
    at the end of June (OK)
    in the end of June (Not OK)
at the beginning of the movie/show/summer :?:
in the beginning of the movie/show/summer :?:



What's the difference between the following phrases?

  • In the beginning, S+V
    At the beginning, S+V
    In the end, S+V
    At the end, S+V

__________(Originally), I planned to travel to Japan to visit Teacher Cas, but I promise Mike to study English harder. ____________ (Finally), I have to cancel the trip.


I dozed off in the show last night. __________(Finally), I didn't have any clue about what the "Cats" was about, there were just too many cats on the stage and it's an Enhlish version. Warning: No more cats jumping on the stage.


I'm sorry to post in a hurry. More later.

:wink:
 

RonBee

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Say:
  • It gets me confused.
Or:
  • It confuses me.

I would say that "at the beginning of the show" means the show is just starting, while "in the beginning of the show" refers to the first part of the show.

:)
 

henry

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Mar 7, 2004
A heavy question! :x

I should quite agree with Ron's. In addition: at the beginning (of) is used for the time and place when something begins. In the beginning = at first suggests a contrast with a later situation.

Hope that'd be useful. :D
 

MikeNewYork

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blacknomi said:
Dear teachers,
I have one question to ask before I go to bed.



"in the end" and "at the end" do confused me at times.

  • at the beginning of June (OK)
    in the beginning of June (Not OK)
    in the middle of June (OK)
    at the middle of June (Not OK)
    at the end of June (OK)
    in the end of June (Not OK)
at the beginning of the movie/show/summer :?:
in the beginning of the movie/show/summer :?:

IMO, "in the beginning of June", is OK. It would refer to the first few days up to a week or so.

I agree with Ron about the movie/show.



What's the difference between the following phrases?

  • In the beginning, S+V
    At the beginning, S+V
    In the end, S+V
    At the end, S+V

1. Earlier than now, originally, during the early part.
2. At the starting point, at the outset
3. Finally, after it was over
4. At the ending point, at the finish


__________(Originally), I planned to travel to Japan to visit Teacher Cas, but I promise Mike to study English harder. ____________ (Finally), I have to cancel the trip.


I dozed off in the show last night. __________(Finally), I didn't have any clue about what the "Cats" was about, there were just too many cats on the stage and it's an Enhlish version. Warning: No more cats jumping on the stage.

In the beginning, I planned to travel to Japan to visit Teacher Cas, but I promised Mike that I would study English harder. In the end, I had to cancel the trip.

I dozed off in the show last night. At the end (of the show), I didn't have any clue about what "Cats" was about; there were just too many cats on the stage and it was an English version. Warning: No more cats jumping on the stage.

I dozed off in the show last night. In the end (when all was said and done), I didn't have any clue about what "Cats" was about; there were just too many cats on the stage and it was an English version. Warning: No more cats jumping on the stage.
 

blacknomi

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MikeNewYork said:
I dozed off in the show last night. At the end (of the show), I didn't have any clue about what "Cats" was about; there were just too many cats on the stage and it was an English version. Warning: No more cats jumping on the stage.

I dozed off in the show last night. In the end (when all was said and done), I didn't have any clue about what "Cats" was about; there were just too many cats on the stage and it was an English version. Warning: No more cats jumping on the stage.

Erm, I wasn't the cat on the stage. So I couldn't have dozed off in the show last night. Corrected as "dozed off during the show."

Ron, Henry and Dear Mike,
I am really grateful to your reply. Thank you very much indeed.

Dear Susie,
You've always been very helpful to me, how about a kiss on the cheek this time, not chin. It sounds even weird to me. 8) LOLOLOL!
 

MikeNewYork

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blacknomi said:
MikeNewYork said:
I dozed off in the show last night. At the end (of the show), I didn't have any clue about what "Cats" was about; there were just too many cats on the stage and it was an English version. Warning: No more cats jumping on the stage.

I dozed off in the show last night. In the end (when all was said and done), I didn't have any clue about what "Cats" was about; there were just too many cats on the stage and it was an English version. Warning: No more cats jumping on the stage.

Erm, I wasn't the cat on the stage. So I couldn't have dozed off in the show last night. Corrected as "dozed off during the show."

During would be better. :wink:

Ron, Henry and Dear Mike,
I am really grateful to your reply. Thank you very much indeed.

Grateful "for" your reply.

You're very welcome. :D
 

RonBee

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Um, say "for your replies" if you mean to address everybody.

:)
 
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