in, on or of?

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Anonymous

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Hello :)

I'd like to ask about what prepositon to use with "team" in the comparative sentence.

Would you take a look at the following sentence?
#1 Jane is the best player ( ) the team.

What preposition should I use, "in," "on" or "of"? Are there more than one choice?

I'll be happy to have a comment.

Thank you.
Lina
 

Tdol

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'In' is the one I'd use, but 'of' is OK too. ;-)
 

RonBee

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A person can be on a team or a member of a team, but I don't think in the team is used.

:)
 

MikeNewYork

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RonBee said:
A person can be on a team or a member of a team, but I don't think in the team is used.

:)

I agree, unless it's a team of horses. :wink:
 

Tdol

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RonBee said:
A person can be on a team or a member of a team, but I don't think in the team is used.

:)

It must be a British\American difference. <yetanother> :lol:
 

RonBee

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tdol said:
RonBee said:
A person can be on a team or a member of a team, but I don't think in the team is used.

:)

It must be a British\American difference. <yetanother> :lol:

I suppose so.

:)
 

MikeNewYork

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tdol said:
RonBee said:
A person can be on a team or a member of a team, but I don't think in the team is used.

:)

It must be a British\American difference. <yetanother> :lol:

I used to think that there were many differences, but now I know that the differences could fill volumes. :shock:
 

Tdol

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Before the Internet, we used to have books with a couple of pages on the vocabulary differences, a standard feature in most text books. Having been in daily contact with Americans for some years, it astonishes me how many small differences there are. Still, we manage to understand one another. ;-)
 

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tdol said:
Before the Internet, we used to have books with a couple of pages on the vocabulary differences, a standard feature in most text books. Having been in daily contact with Americans for some years, it astonishes me how many small differences there are. Still, we manage to understand one another. ;-)

I agree. There is a web site with about 10 differences on it. Very thorough.
 

Tdol

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That was the old school. Nowadays, when answering posts I tend to be less absolute because I try to leave a door open for you or another AE speaker to disagree. It's interesting that years of watching American films and reading American writers made very little impression in comparison. I'd say I knew nothing about AE before I started posting. Well, I did know you say 'faucet'. ;-);-)
 

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tdol said:
That was the old school. Nowadays, when answering posts I tend to be less absolute because I try to leave a door open for you or another AE speaker to disagree. It's interesting that years of watching American films and reading American writers made very little impression in comparison. I'd say I knew nothing about AE before I started posting. Well, I did know you say 'faucet'. ;-);-)

I too have become less certain. I guess it is a good thing. I am certainly glad that I've met you and Red. :wink:
 

Tdol

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It is a good thing. It also affects my teaching here- there are things I'd taught as errors that I now teach as alternatives. ;-)
 
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Susie Smith

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tdol said:
It is a good thing. It also affects my teaching here- there are things I'd taught as errors that I now teach as alternatives. ;-)

I must confess that I used to be biased against BE, but "maturity" has mellowed me. It's not important that some say "on the team" and others say "in the team" as long as we understand each other. However, I do believe that learners find it confusing.
 
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