In / On

Status
Not open for further replies.

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Are we going in the afternoon or evning? <--correct? What does it mean with "in"?
Are we going on the afternoon or evning? <--incorrect? why? What does it mean with "on"?

Where can I get some more practice on this? Can you give me some examples on this? thanks
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
"I am doing pretty good in sniping." <--correct?
"I am doing pretty good on sniping." <--incorrect? why?
 

Francois

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2004
You're doing pretty well at sniping.
You're good at sniping.

'in' may also work instead of 'at', too.

You playing counterstrike or something? :)

FRC
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Actually I was playing Tribes Vengenace.

"It looks like the bed wasn't slept in." <--correct?
"It looks like the bed wasn't slept on." <--incorrect?
"It looks like the bed wasn't slept at." <--correct?

How do I know if it is 'in' or 'on'? How can I check this myself?

Like sniping for example:
"I am doing pretty good in sniping." <--correct
"I am doing pretty good on sniping." <--incorrect
How do I know "on" is incorrect and why is it incorrect?

We need the turrets in a better position. <--correct?
We need the turrets on a better position. <--incorrect?
Why is "on" incorrect?

"What did you get on the first time you toke it?" <--correct?
"What did you get in the first time you toke it?" <--incorrect?
"What did you get at the first time you toke it?" <--incorrect?
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
I have a winamp icon on the taskbar. <--correct? if not, why?
I have a winamp icon at the taskbar. <--correct? if not, why?
I have a winamp icon in the taskbar. <--correct? if not, why?

How do I do this in WIndows XP? <--correct? if not, why?
How do I do this on WIndows XP? <--correct? if not, why?
How do I do this at WIndows XP? <--correct? if not, why?
 
N

Natalie27

Guest
jack said:
Actually I was playing Tribes Vengenace.

"It looks like the bed wasn't slept in." <--correct?
"It looks like the bed wasn't slept on." <--incorrect?
"It looks like the bed wasn't slept at." <--correct?

How do I know if it is 'in' or 'on'? How can I check this myself?

Like sniping for example:
"I am doing pretty good in sniping." <--correct
"I am doing pretty good on sniping." <--incorrect
How do I know "on" is incorrect and why is it incorrect?

We need the turrets in a better position. <--correct?
We need the turrets on a better position. <--incorrect?
Why is "on" incorrect?

"What did you get on the first time you toke it?" <--correct?
"What did you get in the first time you toke it?" <--incorrect?
"What did you get at the first time you toke it?" <--incorrect?


We need the turrets in a better position.
What did you get on your test the first time you took it. or
What did you get the first time you took it. ( we assume you're talking about a test or exam...?)
I am not good at sniping.

to be good at sth
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
What's the difference in meaning between these two?

1. It is not available at this location.
2. It is not available in this location.
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
jack said:
What's the difference in meaning between these two?

1. It is not available at this location.
2. It is not available in this location.

1. location / point
2. location / space / area
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
What's the difference in meaning between these two:

1. How did you get into that clan?
2. How did you get in that clan?

3. How did you get into that room?
4. How did you get in that room?

Does it matter which one I use ( In / Into)?
 

blacknomi

Key Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2004
Member Type
Student or Learner
They are similar but not the same. :D

How did you get into that room?
You are somewhere outside a room, and you are going to get in that room. When you get in that room, you go to the inside of the room.


How did you get in that room?
You simply step in. Or you just turn the door knob and walk in.


Got the picture? :D
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
jack said:
What's the difference in meaning between these two:

1. How did you get into that clan?
2. How did you get in that clan?

3. How did you get into that room?
4. How did you get in that room?

Does it matter which one I use ( In / Into)?

If there's an object after in(to) (i.e., that clan, that room), then it doesn't matter which form you use.

Did you know that in is short for into? :D into is made up of two words: in + to, and since those two words always occur together, to is often omitted. Like this,

1. Come into the house. :D
2. Come in the house. :D

1. and 2. carry the same meaning: in = into.

Note that, 'to', a preposition, requires an object (e.g. to the house), so if there isn't an object, then 'to' is not used.

3. Come in. :D

1., 2., and 3. mean the same thing: Enter.

All the best, :D
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Are these correct?

1 He switched his attention onto me.
2 He switched his attention on me. (There's an object after on, so does that mean it has to be 'onto me'?)

There's no difference in meaning between them right?

3. Now I really regret in not running away.
3. Now I really regret on not running away. (This incorrect? Why?)
4. Now I really regret not running away.
5. Now I really regret at not running away.
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
jack said:
Are these correct?

1 He switched his attention onto me.
2 He switched his attention on me. (There's an object after on, so does that mean it has to be 'onto me'?)

switched on works, but not in that context. Try, to as in toward(s). :D

jack said:
There's no difference in meaning between them right?

3a. Now I really regret in not running away.
3b. Now I really regret on not running away. (This incorrect? Why?)
4. Now I really regret not running away.
5. Now I really regret at not running away.

Regretfully, regret doesn't take a prepositional phrase as its object. :(
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Regretfully, regret doesn't take a prepositional phrase as its object.
So these are not correct?

1. Now I really regret in not running away.
2. Now I really regret on not running away.
3. Now I really regret not running away.
4. Now I really regret at not running away.

Are these correct? If not, why?

5. You can write it in another way.
6. You can write it at another way.
7. You can write it on another way.
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
jack said:
Regretfully, regret doesn't take a prepositional phrase as its object.
So these are not correct?

1. Now I really regret in not running away.
2. Now I really regret on not running away.
3. Now I really regret not running away.
4. Now I really regret at not running away.

3. is correct. :D

jack said:
Are these correct? If not, why?

5. You can write it in another way.
6. You can write it at another way.
7. You can write it on another way.

5. is correct. The correct phrase here is 'in a (certain) way' :wink:

All the best, :D
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Are these correct? If not, why?

1. There is still a virus in my computer.
2. There is still a virus on my computer.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top