In / On

Status
Not open for further replies.
N

Natalie27

Guest
jack said:
Thanks.

5. I'm going to save my files at a folder. (How come this sounds okay? So no matter what, this is wrong?)

you can save your files IN a folder (paper document/computer files)
you can save your files TO a folder (I would think TO relates to compuetr files only...)
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Are these correct? What do these mean?

1. This video card peforms very well in this game.
2. This video card peforms very well on this game.
2. This video card peforms very well at this game.
 
T

TheMadBaron

Guest
jack said:
Are these correct? What do these mean?

1. This video card peforms very well in this game.
2. This video card peforms very well on this game.
3. This video card peforms very well at this game.
They sound a little strange, but I would take them to mean the same thing. I would prefer "This video card peforms very well with this game."

Number three sounds quite wrong to me, because it isn't the video card that plays the game - people play the game.

I might say "John performed very well at tennis", but I wouldn't say 'the ball performed very well at tennis", because it's John who plays tennis - not the ball, the racket or the net.

I would normally use 'in this game' to refer to an element of the game itself.
"There's a big, green, scary monster in this game."

Colloquially, some people use "have a go on" to mean 'play', so the following are possible (though not grammatical)....
"Can I have a go on this game?"
"I've had a go on this game before. It's rubbish."
 
Last edited:

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Are these correct? What do they mean?
1. Sound virbrates better on wood.
2. Sound virbrates better in wood.
 
N

Natalie27

Guest
jack said:
Are these correct? What do they mean?
1. Sound virbrates better on wood.
2. Sound virbrates better in wood.

I would use "through" instead.
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Thanks.

But these are not wrong right? If not, which one could I use?
1. Sound virbrates better on wood. (I think this is right? But why? How can 'sound' be on wood? It doesn't make any sense.)
2. Sound virbrates better in wood. (How sounds right, but it doesn't make sense because how can wood vibrate better IN wood?)
 
N

Natalie27

Guest
jack said:
Thanks.

But these are not wrong right? If not, which one could I use?
1. Sound virbrates better on wood. (I think this is right? But why? How can 'sound' be on wood? It doesn't make any sense.)
2. Sound virbrates better in wood. (How sounds right, but it doesn't make sense because how can wood vibrate better IN wood?)
I suppose it's OK if you are conducting some experiments in physics. Sound is all around us so technically it can travel "in" or "on" wood, I guess. But that wouldn't be my first choice of words.
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Thanks.

What do these mean?
1. She is working on that day.
2. She is working that day. (Is 'on' omitted here?)
 
N

Natalie27

Guest
Natalie27 said:
I suppose it's OK if you are conducting some experiments in physics. Sound is all around us so technically it can travel "in" or "on" wood, I guess. But that wouldn't be my first choice of words.
Sorry Jack, my mistake...for some reason I thought you used the word "travel" in regards to sound but the word is "vibrates".
Vibrates on and in wood is correct!:up:

I am really getting confused at times when concentrating on all those prepositions.;-)
 
N

Natalie27

Guest
jack said:
Thanks.

What do these mean?
1. She is working on that day.
2. She is working that day. (Is 'on' omitted here?)
Both are correct, second one is more common.
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Both are correct, second one is more common.
What's the point of using 'on' then? So 'on' is not omitted in #2?
1. She is working on that day.
2. She is working (on) that day.
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
What do these mean?
1. I live on the west side. (If I'm supposed to use this one, why?)
2. I live in the east side.

3. I live in Canada.
4. I live on Canada. ('on' is incorrect here? But #1 is correct? Is it because it means that your house is the size of Canada?)
 
Last edited:

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Could someone help me with the post above? Thanks.

What do these mean? I have completely no idea about which one to use.
1. I plugged this card onto my motherboard.
2. I plugged this card into my motherboard.
 
N

Natalie27

Guest
jack said:
Could someone help me with the post above? Thanks.

What do these mean? I have completely no idea about which one to use.
1. I plugged this card onto my motherboard.
2. I plugged this card into my motherboard.
I think it all depends on how your computer is built. I would say "into the motherboard" if your card goes directly into it. I would choose "onto" the motherboard" if the slot for the card is soldered onto the motherboard - the slot gadget would be then just an added feature.
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
What do these mean? Does it matter if I use 'in' or 'on'?
1. You were on a car, would you get their faster? (I don't get it. If I'm on a car, I am probably in the car too?)
2. You were in a car, would you get their faster? (If I'm in a car, I'm probably on the car too?
How do you know which one to use?

3. I don't think I can come home in time.
4. I don't think I can come home on time.
 
Last edited:

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Could someone help me with the post above? Thanks.

What do these mean?
1. You can do this on your own time.
2. You can do this in your own time.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top