In the sense of

Tara2

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Hi,

'sense' means 'meaning', right?
Can 'in the sense of' be replaced with 'with the meaning of'? Is there any difference between them?

"We often use 'can' with verbs such as hear, see,...and follow(in the sense of 'understand)"
 

Charlie Bernstein

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Hi,

'Sense' means 'meaning', right?

In that phrase, yes, sort of.

Can 'in the sense of' be replaced with 'with the meaning of'?

No.

Is there any difference between them?

Yes. For one thing, "in the sense of" is idiomatic and "in the meaning of" isn't. For another thing, each word has other meanings, as well.

"We often use 'can' with verbs such as hear, see,...and follow (space) (in the sense of 'understand)."

Yes, "can" often comes before verbs. But I don't understand what you mean. Do you have a question? Can you give an example?

Always start sentences with captial letters. Always end sentences with periods, question marks, or exclamation points.
 

Matthew Wai

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An example sentence in quotes should also start with a capital letter and end in a period/question mark/exclamation mark.
 

GoesStation

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An example sentence in quotes should also start with a capital letter and end in a period/question mark/exclamation mark.

This rule applies even when the quotation begins in the middle of a sentence. Here's an example:

"... Begins in the middle" was not the beginning of the sentence I've quoted from, but I still had to capitalize "begins".
 

Tara2

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This rule applies even when the quotation begins in the middle of a sentence. Here's an example:

"... Begins in the middle" was not the beginning of the sentence I've quoted from, but I still had to capitalize "begins".
Thank you but I don't understand this sentence.
 

Matthew Wai

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'Begins in the middle' was not the beginning of the sentence quoted below, but I still had to capitalize 'B' in this sentence.

This rule applies even when the quotation begins in the middle of a sentence.
 

Charlie Bernstein

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Even when the sentence start with Quotation mark or end with quotation mark?

Okay. I'm just talking about the letter, not the punctuation. You can't capitalize a quotation mark!

So: if it's a quote, then yes, start with a quotation mark, of course. Then make your first letter a capital.

If the quote starts with a small letter, like "and then she burped," write it like this:

"[A]nd then she burped." Brackets show that you changed the quote to fit your text.

In British English, the period would go outside the quotation mark, like this:

"[A]nd then she burped".

In American English, periods and commas always go inside quotation marks, no matter what.

In Both American and British English, put question marks and exclamation points inside quotation marka only when the marks are part of the original quotes. Otherwise, put them outside.
 

emsr2d2

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If the quote starts with a word that was originally in the middle of a sentence, I use quotation marks followed by an ellipsis and then a lower-case letter. I would write:

"... and then she burped".
 

Charlie Bernstein

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Tara2, you originally said:

- "We often use 'can' with verbs such as hear, see,...and follow(in the
sense of 'understand)"

I still don't understand that line. Can you explain? Do you have a question? What is it?
 

Tara2

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Tara2, you originally said:

- "We often use 'can' with verbs such as hear, see,...and follow(in the
sense of 'understand)"

I still don't understand that line. Can you explain? Do you have a question? What is it?
That line says that we can use 'can' with the sensitive verbs. I was reading about 'can'.

No I don't have question about that line only bout 'sense', that it was answered.
 
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